Motorcycle Aftermarket Parts

This page last reviewed December 17, 2012

List of exempted motorcycle aftermarket critical emission control parts in compliance with applicable California evaluation procedures.  (PDF - 35K)  (Last updated December 17, 2012)

January 22-23, 2009, Board Hearing Documents for the Consideration of Proposed California Evaluation Procedures for Aftermarket Critical Emission Control Parts on Highway Motorcycles  

  • Public Hearing Notice: Invitation to the public and affected industries to discuss the proposed evaluation procedures for the exemption of aftermarket critical emission control parts for highway motorcycles.  This notice includes the date, time, location, and a summary of the issues to be covered during the hearing. (PDF - 46K)
  • Staff Report: Initial Statement of Reasons (ISOR): Descriptions and discussion of the proposed requirements, issues, and impacts of the evaluation procedures. (PDF - 102K)
  • Regulation and Evaluation Procedures: 
    • Regulatory Order: Addition of title 13, California Code of Regulations (CCR), section 2222(j). (PDF - 6K)
    • California Evaluation Procedures for Aftermarket Critical Emission Control Parts on Highway Motorcycles. (PDF - 85K)

August 20, 2008, Highway Motorcycle Aftermarket Parts Public Workshop Documents

  • Workshop Notice (Mail-Out #MSO 08-05): Invitation to the public and industry to a second discussion concerning modified procedures for the exemption of highway motorcycle aftermarket parts incorporating critical emission components, including catalytic converters and oxygen sensors.  This second workshop is a follow-up to the one held on April 9, 2008. (PDF 170K) 
  • Modified Draft Regulatory Procedure The proposed exemption procedures have been modified based on comments received regarding the initial proposal presented at ARB's April 9, 2008, workshop. (PDF 596K) 
  • Supplemental Changes to the Draft Regulatory Procedure These changes were made after issue of the Modified Draft Regulatory Procedure.  They were made available and discussed at the August 20, 2008, workshop. (PDF 157K)  

April 9, 2008, Highway Motorcycle Aftermarket Parts Public Workshop Documents

  • Workshop Notice (Mail-Out #MSO 08-03): Invitation to the public and industry to discuss proposed procedures for the exemption of highway motorcycle aftermarket parts incorporating critical emission components. (PDF 123K)

  • Draft Regulatory Procedure (PDF 168K) Much of the procedure is based on existing motorcycle certification practices. As such, interested parties may also find it useful to review ARB's certification guidance document

  • Workshop Slide Presentation (PDF 167K)

  • Information Request Handout. This document requests answers to several questions that will help quantify the economic impacts of the proposal to stakeholders, as well as provide a clearer picture of the affected aftermarket industries. Responses to this handout should be submitted by May 15, 2008. (PDF 18K)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ):
Since September 2006, the Air Resources Board (ARB) initiated a series of meetings with the motorcycle industry to discuss ways to comply with applicable California regulations. At these meetings, many questions were asked pertaining to the sale and installation of aftermarket motorcycle parts in California. The following are answers to some of the commonly asked questions:    
Questions:

Q1.
How do I know if I can legally sell or install aftermarket parts for motorcycles?

Q2.
Which motorcycle parts must receive an anti-tampering exemption from ARB?

Q3.
How do I go about receiving an exemption from ARB?

Q4.
How do I know that the parts on my motorcycle have received the proper VC 27156 exemption?

Q1. How do I know if I can legally sell or install aftermarket parts for motorcycles?

A1.
Vehicle Code section 27156 (VC 27156), California's anti-tampering law, prohibits the installation of any add-on or modified emission-related part on any pollution-controlled motorcycles, unless the part has been exempted by ARB. ARB exempts a motorcycle part from the prohibition of VC 27156 if the part is found to do either of the following: 1) not reduce the effectiveness of any required emission control device on the motorcycle or 2) demonstrate that the applicable emission standards are being met when the part(s) are installed on the motorcycle.

Motorcycles which are manufactured for on-road use have been pollution controlled since the 1979 model year. Starting the 1979 model year, add-on and modified parts for on-road motorcycles have been required to receive an anti-tampering exemption. Likewise, motorcycles which are manufactured for off-road use have been pollution controlled since 1997 model year and are subject to the prohibitions in VC 27156.

Q2. Which motorcycle parts must receive an anti-tampering exemption from ARB?

A2. VC 27156 only applies to emission-related add-on and modified parts. These are parts that are not functionally identical to an original part on the motorcycle. Some examples are fuel injection systems, re-jetting of carburetors, aftermarket catalytic converters, performance camshafts, and gear sprockets. Conversely, parts that serve as direct replacements to stock parts, like spark plugs, plug wires or air cleaner elements, do not need to be exempted. Manufacturers though must maintain records with specification data that confirm their replacement parts are indeed functionally identical. Note that exhaust systems (headers or mufflers) intended for installation on non-catalyst equipped motorcycles are also considered by ARB to be replacement parts provided all emission controls originally connected to the exhaust manifold are reconnected to the exhaust system and are functioning properly.

Non-emission-related parts are not affected by VC 27156 and do not require prior approval from ARB to be sold or installed. Examples of non-emission-related parts include storage bags / racks, mirrors, suspension components, seats, wheel rims, and decorative accessories.

Q3. How do I go about receiving an exemption from ARB?

A3. Aftermarket manufacturers of add-on and modified parts applying for an exemption must submit an
application form to ARB describing the part or device, and which motorcycle models that it is intended to be used.

In most cases, ARB requires emission testing to confirm compliance with the applicable motorcycle emission standards. See more detailed information on how to complete the exemption process.

Once a part is exempted, the manufacturer is issued an Executive Order (E.O.) which certifies that the part is now legal for sale. However, it cannot be installed on a new motorcycle until the motorcycle has been sold to an ultimate purchaser. California law requires that all new motorcycles be sold in their original, emission-certified configuration with no modifications. Failure to comply with any of the above requirements for exemption or sale of such parts can result in enforcement penalties to the aftermarket part manufacturer.

Q4. How do I know that the parts on my motorcycle have received the proper VC 27156 exemption?

A4. Aftermarket part manufacturers are required to provide a label to identify each exempted part sold. The label should indicate the manufacturer's name, device name and a valid E.O. number assigned by ARB. The format of the E.O. number is D-xxx-xxx, where "xxx" is a series of designated numbers. The label is either affixed directly to the part itself or included with the part with instructions to install it in a visible location. Look for this label when shopping for emission-related aftermarket motorcycle parts.

The legality of a part can also be verified from
ARB's website.  Parts can be searched by type or by assigned E.O. number.

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