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1-866-6DIESEL Hotline's Most Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) subjects on this page:

    updated tag Upcoming Deadlines
    
Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation and reporting
     Truck and Bus Regulation
     Truck and Bus Regulation reporting system - TRUCRS


Other FAQ and example pages:

    Truck and Bus Regulation example fleets for owners of 1 to 3 trucks or buses


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Link iconTractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation FAQs

1. What is the purpose of the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation? (Click on the question to see the answer)

The California Air Resources Board (ARB) adopted the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas regulation in December 2008 to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions produced by certain heavy-duty tractor-trailers. The reduction in greenhouse gas emissions will be achieved by requiring the use of aerodynamic tractors and trailers that are also equipped with low rolling resistance tires.

Along with reducing greenhouse gas emissions, this regulation is expected to reduce diesel fuel consumption. Tractor-trailer combinations that comply with the regulation by proper use of aerodynamic equipment and low rolling resistance tires are expected to achieve a fuel efficiency improvement of up to 10 percent. Overall, the regulation is expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 0.7 million metric tons of carbon dioxide-equivalents by 2020, statewide. Over the 11 years between 2010, when the rule went into effect, and the end of 2020, it is estimated that truckers and trucking companies will realize net savings (fuel savings minus maintenance costs) of about $5.5 billion when diesel fuel consumption is reduced by as much as three billion gallons nationwide.

2. What are the requirements for the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation, and does it apply to me?

The Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas regulation applies to 53-foot or longer box-type trailers, including both dry-van and refrigerated-van trailers, and all heavy-duty (HD) tractors (gross vehicle weight rating greater than 26,000 lbs.) that pull them on California highways. Any California-licensed vehicle dealer selling an affected vehicle must provide a disclosure notice about the regulation to the buyer. For more information, visit the TruckStop portal for the Tractor-Trailer GHG Regulation.

REFERENCE TABLES:

Smartway Verified Low Rolling Resistance Tires, first deadline for 2010 model year and older tractors is Jan 1, 2013

3. I own 20 or fewer 53-foot or longer box-type trailers. Therefore, I am eligible for the Small Fleet Phase-In Option to delay my aerodynamic requirements. When do I need to register to take advantage of this extension?

The Small Fleet Phase-In Option requires trailer owners of 2010 and older model years to register by the extended deadline January 1, 2013, to delay aerodynamic requirements.

Example:  Based on the Small Fleet Compliance Schedule above, an owner of a trailer fleet that consists of one (1) 53-foot trailer could register that trailer by January 1, 2013, and delay their requirement to install the required aerodynamic technology on that trailer from January 1, 2013, to January 1, 2015.

To register, please visit our Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation reporting website.

Note: Model years 2003 to 2009 refrigerated-van trailers, or 53-foot or longer box-type trailers with reefer units, equipped with 2003 or newer model year transport refrigeration unit engines  may follow a delayed compliance schedule starting January 1, 2018. (Refer to question 20).

4. I own 21 or more 53-foot or longer box-type trailers. Therefore, I am eligible for the Large Fleet Reporting Phase-In Option (1 or 2) to delay my aerodynamic requirements. When do I need to report to take advantage of this extension?

Registration has closed for Option 1 and Option 2 of the Large Fleet Compliance Plan, which required trailer owners to report by July 1, 2010, and June 1, 2012, respectively. 

Large fleet compliance schedule

Example: Based on Option 2 of the Large Fleet Compliance Plan above, an owner of 21 (twenty-one) 53-foot box-type trailers would have had to register and report by June 1, 2012, and ensure that 20 percent or four of the 53-foot trailers were equipped with SmartWay verified aerodynamic requirements by June 1, 2012. Additionally, 40 percent or eight of the 53-foot trailers must be equipped with SmartWay verified aerodynamic requirements by January 1, 2013.

Note: Model years 2003 to 2009 refrigerated-van trailers (53-foot or longer box-type trailers with reefer units) equipped with 2003 or newer model year transport refrigeration unit engines, are required to be in compliance by January 1, 2018, for 2003 through 2004 model year trailers; by January 1, 2019, for 2005 through 2006 model year trailers; and by January 1, 2020, for 2007 through 2009 model year trailers. (Refer to question 20)

5. Did the Large Fleet Phase-In Option reporting deadline change?

Yes, if you own 21 or more trailers that are model year 2010 and older, you had the choice to register and report by June 1, 2012, for Option 2 of the Large Fleet Compliance Plan.;

Background: The Office of Administrative Law approved emergency regulations on March 12, 2012, to formally extend the registration deadline for Option 2 of the Large Fleet Compliance Plan of the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Regulation to June 1, 2012. This option allows trailer fleet owners to gradually meet the regulatory requirements over five years, beginning in 2012 and ending in 2016. See compliance schedule below.

Large Fleet Compliance Schedule

6. What are Low Rolling Resistance (LRR) tires?

Low rolling resistance (LRR) tires are defined in this regulation as tires designed to improve the fuel efficiency of tractor-trailers by minimizing their rolling resistance. As tires roll under the vehicle’s weight, they deflect and dissipate energy into heat. The rolling resistance of a tire is the energy lost per unit distance traveled as the tire rolls under load. A tire with less rolling resistance is more fuel efficient than one with greater rolling resistance.

The goal of requiring SmartWay verified LRR tires on tractors and trailers is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by achieving a fuel consumption savings of about three percent from the tractor-trailer combination. Information about which LRR tires are SmartWay verified can be found on the U.S. EPA SmartWay Transport Partnership website.

The Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas regulation applies to 53-foot or longer box-type trailers, including both dry-van and refrigerated-van trailers, and all heavy-duty (HD) tractors (gross vehicle weight rating greater than 26,000 lbs.) that pull them on California highways. Any California-licensed vehicle dealer selling an affected vehicle must provide a disclosure notice about the regulation to the buyer. For more information, visit the TruckStop portal for the Tractor-Trailer GHG Regulation.

REFERENCE TABLES:

Smartway Verified Low Rolling Resistance Tires, first deadline for 2010 model year and older tractors is Jan 1, 2013
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7. How much do Low Rolling Resistance (LRR) tires cost?

The cost to upgrade to SmartWay verified low rolling resistance (LRR) tires is minimal.  The average cost to replace radial tires with LRR tires ranges from an additional $0 to $50 per tire, a difference that can be recovered through the fuel savings earned by using more fuel efficient LRR tires.

8. How do I know if my tires are SmartWay verified Low Rolling Resistance (LRR) tires? Are they the same as low profile tires, open shoulder tires, conventional dual tires or wide base single tires?

If a tire model is not listed on the SmartWay list of verified tires, then the tire cannot be used to comply with this regulation. Information about which tires are SmartWay verified can be found on the U.S. EPA SmartWay Transport Partnership website.

  • Low profile tires are not considered to be the same as LRR tires. 
  • Open shoulder tires are typically designed for greater traction.  Although most of them are not LRR tires, there are two models currently on the SmartWay list of verified LRR tires.   There is a partial exemption available that allows the use of two or more non-SmartWay verified open shoulder drive tires (for the drive position only) until January 1, 2013. Tractors equipped with only one open shoulder drive tire that are not SmartWay verified tires would not be in compliance with the regulation.
  • New generation wide-base single tires or conventional dual tires can be used, as long as the tires are SmartWay verified.
9. What are U.S. EPA SmartWay verified aerodynamic technologies?

Aerodynamic technologies as defined by the regulation are components designed to reduce wind resistance on the tractor or trailer resulting in improved overall tractor fuel economy and reduced carbon dioxide emissions.
EPA has verified the following categories of aerodynamic technologies:

  • Trailer Gap Reducer (used in combination with Trailer Side Skirts );
  • Trailer Boat Tail (used in combination with Trailer Side Skirts );
  • Trailer Side Skirts
  • Advanced Trailer End Fairings (includes end fairings and undercarriage devices); and,
  • Advanced Trailer Skirts.

U.S. EPA SmartWay aerodynamic technologies include gap fairings that reduce turbulence between the tractor and trailer, side skirts that minimize wind under the trailer, and rear fairings and undercarriage devices that reduce turbulence and pressure drop at the rear of the trailer. These technologies, when used in combination with one another or in some cases when used alone, may reduce fuel consumption by an estimated five percent or greater relative to the truck's baseline, when used in conjunction with an aerodynamic tractor in highway type operation.

10. How much do trailer aerodynamic technologies cost, and is there any funding assistance to help me purchase these SmartWay technologies?

Aerodynamic technologies range in cost depending on the manufacturer and type of technology purchased.  Generally, the cost to retrofit a trailer with SmartWay verified aerodynamic technologies is between $1,000-$2,000.  Relative to a non-retrofitted, regular baseline trailer, a SmartWay designated trailer used with a fully-aerodynamic profile, high-roof tractor and integrated roof fairing and side fairings achieves six and a half percent or greater reduction in fuel consumption.  All trailer equipment must be maintained per manufacturer’s service recommendations or replaced if necessary.

Small business owners may qualify for loans from participating California Capital Access Programs (CalCAP).  CalCAP encourages banks and other financial institutions to make loans to small businesses that fall outside of their conventional underwriting standards.  CalCAP is a form of loan portfolio insurance that may provide up to 100 percent coverage on certain loan defaults. See the following CalCAP website pages for more information: California Capital Access Program and ARB PLACE Program for On-Road Vehicles.

11. Who is exempt from the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Regulation?

According to Subarticle 1(b), Sections 95301, title 17, California Code of Regulations, the following tractors and trailers are exempt from any requirements:

      • Drop-frame trailers
      • Chassis trailers
      • Curtain-side trailers
      • Livestock trailers
      • Refuse trailers
      • Box-type trailers less than 53 feet in length
      • Emergency vehicles
      • Military tactical support vehicles
12. I plan to sell a tractor that can pull a 53-foot trailer, and/or I plan to sell a 53-foot trailer. What do I need to know about the requirements that I have to follow?

Somewhat similar to the On-Road Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicles (In-Use) Regulation or Truck and Bus Regulation, there is a disclosure statement that must be provided by California-licensed dealers when selling a tractor or trailer subject to this regulation.

Any California-licensed vehicle dealer selling a Heavy Duty tractor with a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,000 lbs. or a 53-foot or longer box-type trailer subject to this regulation must provide the following disclosure on or with the bill of sale:

“A heavy-duty tractor and 53-foot or longer box-type trailer operated in California may be subject to the California Air Resources Board Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Measure. These vehicles may be required to use low-rolling resistance tires and meet aerodynamic equipment requirements to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

For more information, please visit the Tractor-Trailer GHG program webpage

13. I am leasing my tractor and/or 53-foot or longer trailer. What are my responsibilities for bringing my vehicle into compliance?

Generally, for a leased tractor and/or 53-foot or longer trailer, the person(s) registered as the owner of the tractor or trailer by the California Department of Motor Vehicles or its equivalent in another state, province, or country (usually the lessor) is the owner and is responsible for bringing the vehicle into compliance. However, the lessee of the tractor and/or trailer is considered the owner and held responsible for bringing the vehicle into compliance if the lease includes one of the following disclosure statements:

Disclosure Statements

Leased Tractor

“The lessee of this heavy-duty tractor understands that when using a heavy-duty tractor to pull a 53-foot or longer box-type trailer on a highway within California, the heavy-duty tractor must be compliant with sections 95300 – 95312, title 17, California Code of Regulations, and that it is the responsibility of the lessee to ensure this heavy-duty tractor is compliant. The regulations may require this heavy-duty tractor to have low rolling resistance tires that are U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) SmartWay Verified Technologies prior to current or future use in California, or may entirely prohibit use of this tractor in California if it is a model year 2011 or later tractor and is not a U.S. EPA SmartWay Certified Tractor.”

Leased Trailer

“The lessee of this box-type trailer understands that when using a heavy-duty tractor to pull a 53-foot or longer box-type trailer on a highway within California, the box-type trailer must be compliant with sections 95300-95312, title 17, California Code of Regulations, and that it is the responsibility of the lessee to ensure this box-type trailer is compliant.  The regulations may require this trailer to have low-rolling resistance tires and aerodynamic technologies that are U.S. Environmental Protection Agency SmartWay Verified Technologies prior to current or future use in California.”

• For trailers leased prior to January 1, 2013

For a trailer that is leased prior to January 1, 2013, the person(s) registered as the owner of the trailer by the California Department of Motor Vehicles or its equivalent in another state, province, or country (usually the lessor) is the owner and is responsible for bringing the vehicle into compliance. However, the lessee of the trailer is considered the owner and held responsible for bringing the vehicle into compliance when:
a) The lessor demonstrates that either the lease agreement permits the lessee to modify the trailer to be compliant with the requirements of this subarticle, or b) the lessor provides a reasonable method to exchange the trailer for one that is compliant with this subarticle. c) The lease agreement includes the leased trailer disclosure statement above.

• For trailers leased on or after January 1, 2013

Finally, for a leased trailer that is leased on or after January 1, 2013, the person(s) registered as the owner of the trailer by the California Department of Motor Vehicles or its equivalent in another state, province, or country (usually the lessor) is the owner and is responsible for bringing the vehicle into compliance. However, the lessee of the trailer is considered the owner and held responsible for bringing the vehicle into compliance if the lease includes the disclosure statement above.

14. I want to claim an exemption for “short haul.” Do I qualify?

Tractor owners can apply for an exemption for “short haul” if the tractor operates less than 50,000 miles per year (total mileage in and out of California). This exemption allows all “short-haul” tractors to be exempt from all requirements of the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation; these exemptions include SmartWay technology requirements including low rolling resistance tires and aerodynamics.

The tractor must be registered with ARB to qualify for this exemption. To register, please visit our Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation reporting website for more information.

When is my deadline to register for the “short haul” exemption?

  • 2011 and newer model year tractors should register now before operating on California highways. Otherwise, your tractor needs to have low rolling resistance tires to operate legally in California.

  • 2010 and older model year tractors should register by January 1, 2013, before operating on California highways.  Otherwise, the tractor and the 53-foot or longer box trailer it pulls will need to meet the requirements of the regulation. 

  • See the General Fact Sheet for more information regarding applicable requirements.

  • How will the “short haul” exemption for my tractor affect the 53-foot or longer box trailer that I pull? What requirements will my trailer have?

Whether you own or just pull a 53-foot or longer box-type trailer with your “short haul” exempt tractor, the affected trailer will also be exempt from any requirements.  The 53-foot or longer trailer is exempt from requirements only when pulled by a “short haul” exempt and registered tractor.

15. I want to claim an exemption for “local haul.” Do I qualify?

A tractor or trailer may qualify for a “local haul” exemption if it operates exclusively within a 100-mile radius from where it is garaged, based, or routinely dispatched.  A registered local-haul tractor or trailer is exempt from the aerodynamic requirements of this regulation but not from the low rolling resistance (LRR) tire requirements.

The tractor or trailer must be registered with ARB to qualify for this exemption.  To register, please visit our Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation reporting website for more information.


What if my “local haul” tractor pulls a regular 53-foot or longer box trailer that operates outside a 100-mile radius?  What requirements will my regular 53-foot box-type trailer have?

Generally, the trailer pulled by a “local haul” tractor is exempt from aerodynamic requirements and does not need to be registered.  If, however, that same trailer does not have a "local haul" exemption and is sometimes pulled by non-exempt tractors, then that trailer will be subject to the requirements of the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas regulation.


When is my deadline to register for the “local haul” exemption?

  • 2011 and newer model year tractors and trailers should register for exemption from the aerodynamic requirements now before operating on California highways. Otherwise, your tractor will need to be a SmartWay certified tractor equipped with SmartWay verified aerodynamic equipment and LRR tires, and your trailer will need to be a SmartWay certified trailer or retrofitted with aerodynamic equipment and LRR tires to operate legally in California. 
  • 2010 and older model year 53-foot or longer trailers that are not participating in a phase-in option, have not registered for an exemption, and are pulled by a non-exempt tractor, require the installation of SmartWay verified aerodynamic technologies by January 1, 2013. If you have a trailer that is or will be operating exclusively as a local-haul trailer, you should register for the exemption by January 1, 2013, or if out of state, whenever you bring a trailer into California that will be used exclusively for local-haul purposes.
  • 2010 and older model year tractors should register for the exemption (1) prior to pulling non-compliant trailers affected by the regulation or, (2) upon designating a tractor exclusively for local-haul purposes.

  • What if I want to relocate my registered local-haul trailer to another local-haul base?

    An exempt local-haul trailer may be moved to a new local-haul base outside of the 100-mile radius without jeopardizing its local-haul exemption status if the trailer is transported empty of freight.  In addition, you may apply to ARB for a relocation pass, which allows you to move a loaded local-haul trailer outside its designated 100-mile radius, up to four times per year, with each pass not to exceed five days.  A local-haul trailer cannot receive a new relocation pass until 30 days after the previous relocation pass was issued.

16. I am a driver of a tractor that pulls a 53-foot trailer. How am I affected by this regulation?

Drivers cannot operate a heavy-duty tractor to pull a 53-foot or longer box-type trailer on a highway within California unless both the tractor and trailer comply with the operating requirements and compliance deadlines as required by the regulation.  For more information on Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation requirements, see question 2.

17. I am a motor carrier, and I dispatch 53-foot trailers and the tractors that pull these 53-foot or longer box-type trailers. How am I affected by this regulation?

A motor carrier must only dispatch a 53-foot or longer box-type trailer and/or a heavy-duty tractor that pulls a 53-foot or longer box-type trailer for travel on a highway within California if the tractor or trailer complies with the operating requirements and compliance deadlines as required by the regulation.  For more information on Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation requirements, see question 2.

18. I am a California-based broker that dispatches 53-foot trailers. How am I affected by this regulation?

A California-based broker must only dispatch a 53-foot or longer box-type trailer and/or a heavy-duty tractor that pulls a 53-foot or longer box-type trailer for travel on a highway within California if the tractor or trailer complies with the operating requirements and compliance deadlines as required by the regulation.  For more information on Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation requirements, see question 2.

19. I am a California-based shipper that handles 53-foot or longer box-type trailers. How am I affected by this regulation?

A California-based shipper must not ship or receive freight in a 53-foot or longer box-type trailer pulled by a heavy-duty tractor unless the tractor and the 53-foot or longer box-type trailer comply with the operating requirements and compliance deadlines as required by the regulation.  For more information on Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation requirements, see question 2.

20. I own a 53-foot or longer refrigerated-van trailer or box-type trailer with a reefer unit. What are my requirements?

Beginning January 1, 2010, all 2011 and newer model year refrigerated-van trailers must have SmartWay verified low rolling resistance (LRR) tires and aerodynamic technologies that have been demonstrated to the U.S. EPA to meet or exceed a four percent fuel savings in accordance with the requirements defined by the U.S. EPA SmartWay Partnership Program.

A 2010 or older model year 53-foot or longer box-type trailer must install LRR tires by January 1, 2017, and meet the SmartWay aerodynamic requirements by January 1, 2013, unless they choose to register for a compliance phase-in option or meet the refrigerated-van provision criteria, as explained below.

Refrigerated Van Provision: Owners of model years 2003 to 2009, 53-foot or longer refrigerated-van trailers, or box-type trailers with reefer units equipped with 2003 or newer model year transport refrigeration unit engines, may delay the SmartWay Low Rolling Resistance (LRR) tire and aerodynamic requirements as shown below. Owners of fleets that consist of only refrigerated-van trailers meeting the criteria above are not required to register or report for this special provision.

  • January 1, 2018 - for a 2003 or 2004 model year trailer
  • January 1, 2019 - for a 2005 or 2006 model year trailer
  • January 1, 2020 - for a 2007 to 2009 model year trailer

(Note: If your fleet consists of both dry- and refrigerated-van trailers and you choose to follow an optional phase-in compliance schedule, you must register your fleet with ARB.)

If you own or operate a transport refrigeration unit or reefer, please see the TRU program page for more information.

22. I have registered my fleet with ARB; what are my reporting requirements? When do I need to report and what information will I need?

  • After you have registered your fleet and indicated the appropriate phase-in schedule you will follow, you will need to report which trailers you designated to meet the phase-in compliance requirements for each year, and how those trailers were brought into compliance.

  • Trailers are considered compliant if they are (1) retrofitted with aerodynamic technologies, (2) removed from an owner’s fleet, or (3) restricted from traveling in California.

  • Reporting is required by December 31st of each compliance year, but may be completed any time prior to the deadline.  The compliance year is the calendar year prior to the compliance deadline.

  • You can report your compliant trailer information online on the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation reporting website. To access your fleet information and complete the reporting process, you will need your User name and Password, which were issued to you when you initially registered your trailer fleet. In addition, for each trailer being reported, you will need the (1) vehicle identification information, (2) method of compliance, and (3) date of compliance.

  • It will be helpful to watch this step-by-step Registering and reporting for the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation video.

Example: If you own 20 or fewer trailers and choose to follow the small fleet phase-in option, you must register your fleet by the extended deadline, January 1, 2013. When you register online, you will list your required trailers and indicate that you are choosing to follow the small fleet phase-in option. The small fleet phase-in option applies only to 2010 and older MY trailers that enter California and requires that 25% of your fleet be compliant by January 1, 2014. In other words, sometime during the year 2013 (the compliance year) you should be bringing your trailers into compliance to meet the January 1, 2014, deadline.

For this example, if you own 20 trailers that operate in California, five would need to be compliant by January 1, 2014. When you register for the Small Fleet Phase-In Option, you will register all the 53-foot or longer box-type trailers in your fleet, regardless of where these trailers are based or where they operate. If you retrofitted all five trailers in August 2013, your fleet would be compliant, and you would need to report this activity by December 31, 2013.

23. How will the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation be enforced?

  • The Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation with be enforced in several ways.  There will be field inspectors doing enforcement at CHP weigh stations and other random roadside locations, distribution centers, fleet facilities, truck stops and locations where trucks are present.  In addition, fleets will be randomly requested to provide documentation that their fleet is in compliance with the regulation and complaints will be investigated to ensure compliance.

  • When will you begin enforcing the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation? Can I get a ticket today?  Enforcement is currently being done on all applicable Model Year 2011 tractors and trailers, and will start this summer on all other applicable vehicles. You can be cited currently, as the regulation has been in effect since January 1, 2010, but full compliance may be phased-in over a period of several years.

  • How much is the fine? Penalties can be up to $1,000 per violation per day, though mitigating circumstances may reduce the total penalties.

  • How will ARB enforce the regulation? As noted above, enforcement will be done at various locations around California and desk audits will be done based on things like complaints received and through audits by ARB of various fleets chosen randomly.  Random fleets will be requested by ARB to submit their documentation to be verified by ARB staff to assure that the fleet is in compliance based on the option that the fleet has chosen to use. Most options will require that the fleet be entered into the Truck Regulation Upload, Compliance, and Reporting System (TRUCRS), on the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation reporting website.

  • What do I do now if my tractor and/or trailer is out of compliance? You should make every effort to come into compliance with the regulation as quickly as possible. If you already have been cited for a violation of the regulation, the sooner you act the lower the penalties you will face.  You cannot legally operate a vehicle in the state of California that is subject to, but out of compliance with, a regulation. The more you operate a vehicle in the State that does not comply with a regulation, the greater the risk of being cited for a violation of the regulation. It is the choice of the vehicle owner whether to continue to operate a non-compliant vehicle in the State.

Link iconTruck and Bus Regulation FAQs

1. Am I subject to the Truck and Bus Regulation? (Click on the question to see the answer)

The regulation applies to nearly all privately and federally owned diesel fueled on-road trucks, buses, and school buses with a gross vehicle weight rating greater than 14,000 pounds that operate in California. The rule includes vehicles originally designed to be driven on public highways whether or not they are registered or used on-road. Certain vehicles are exempt from the Truck and Bus Regulation.

Note: A motor home or pick-up truck, if used solely for personal use, is exempt from the requirements of the Truck and Bus Regulation. There is no need to report in TRUCRS.

2. What is the purpose of the Truck and Bus Regulation?

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Most diesel trucks and buses last 20 years or longer and many have little or no emission controls. As a result, these vehicles emit large amounts of harmful air pollution, including particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen. Reducing emissions from existing vehicles is necessary to meet federally imposed clean air standards and to reduce the adverse health effects from truck and bus pollution.

On December 12, 2008, the California Air Resources Board approved the Truck and Bus Regulation to significantly reduce particulate matter, or PM, and oxides of nitrogen emissions from existing diesel vehicles operating in California. The regulation requires diesel trucks and buses that operate in California to be upgraded to reduce emissions. The regulation requires installation of particulate matter (PM) retrofits for heavier trucks beginning January 1, 2012 and replacement of older trucks starting January 1, 2015. By January 1, 2023, nearly all trucks and buses will need to have 2010 model year engines or equivalent. See more information in Truck and Bus Regulation Compliance Requirements Summary.

The Regulation gives two main options for compliance - a Model Year Schedule and a Phase-In Option. The Model Year Schedule outlines clean-up requirements based on the vehicle’s engine model year. Lighter vehicles and heavier vehicles have separate compliance schedules to follow; no reporting is required when this option is used exclusively. The Phase-In Option provides flexibility by allowing fleets to meet a minimum percentage of clean-up requirements for each year— only heavier trucks may use this option and reporting is required.

There are additional flexibility options that can help delay clean-up requirements for fleets. More compliance information can be found on the Truck and Bus Regulation Questions & Answers webpage at: How about FAQ #12?


3. Does the Truck and Bus Regulation include my trailers?

No. The Truck and Bus Regulation applies only to on-road vehicles and not trailers. However, if you pull or own 53-foot or longer box-type trailers, you may be subject to the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation, which requires U.S. Environmental Protection Agency SmartWay certified improvements in aerodynamics and the use of low rolling resistance tires on equipment.

See the Tractor-Trailer Greenhouse Gas Regulation Frequently Asked Questions above for more information.

4. What is a PM filter?

A particulate matter (PM) filter is an air pollution control device. It is similar to a muffler, but it helps to reduce PM emissions from your vehicle. The technical name for a PM Filter is a Verified Diesel Emission Control Strategy (VDECS). A VDECS is a technology that is confirmed by ARB to reduce harmful air pollution from diesel engine exhaust before it is emitted into the air. A VDECS can encompass many different types of technologies that reduce NOx and/or PM emissions at different amounts, known as Levels and Marks. Under the Truck and Bus Regulation, vehicles that require a PM filter retrofit must use a VDECS device that is the cleanest available. In nearly all cases this is a filter verified to achieve at least an 85 percent reduction in PM emissions, which is also known as a Level 3 device. PM filters that have been verified to reduce PM emission by at least 50 percent (Level 2) can be used if a Level 3 VDECS is not available for the engine. The regulation does not permit use of a Level 1 device for compliance.

The Heavy-Duty Diesel Emission Control Strategy (DECS) Installation and Maintenance includes information on how to select and maintain a PM filter, a list of installers and short educational videos.

5. How do I get a PM filter installed on my vehicle?

Fleet owners should contact manufacturers or authorized installers of particulate matter (PM) filters to arrange installation. An authorized installer will typically identify appropriate PM filter(s) for your vehicle. We recommend that you use a qualified, knowledgeable company familiar with PM filter installations. It is important that the installer ensures that the installed PM filter meets the requirements for the Executive Order issued for each verified device. Note that ARB does not recommend specific devices or installers, but as a public service maintains a list of installers. Make sure the filter you choose is on our list of currently verified PM filters.

Your engine family name will be required and can be found on the engine emission control label (ECL) inside the engine compartment, usually on the engine block. An ECL is required on every 1974 or newer diesel vehicle over 6,000 pounds. If the ECL is missing or not readable, call your local engine distributor or the engine manufacturer with the engine serial number to obtain the model year AND to have the label replaced. Check out our ECL video and ECL webpage for information and photos of labels.

6. How much do PM filters cost?

The cost of a particulate matter (PM) filter will vary depending on a number of factors such as engine size, engine model year and the type of PM Filter installed. The range in cost is typically between $10,000 to $20,000, which includes the filter, back pressure monitor, installation and warranty. ARB does not determine or regulate the cost of PM filters.

7. Is there any funding available to help cover the cost of a PM filter or engine upgrade?

Funding is generally limited, but there are a number of incentive funding programs that provide grants, loans, or vouchers to help truck and diesel equipment owners. These funding opportunities are intended to help with the purchase of cleaner trucks and equipment to achieve additional emissions reductions that are generally above and beyond any regulatory requirements.


Many of the funding programs are managed by the local air quality districts. Equipment owners are encouraged to apply as early as possible to maximize potential funding options. In addition, loan assistance for small businesses may be available to help purchase trucks, or install PM filters. For more information on incentive funding visit the TruckStop website.

8. What if no PM filter is available for my vehicle?

The particulate matter (PM) filter requirements for the Truck and Bus regulation requires Level 3 PM filters (85% PM emissions reduction) to be installed, if available. If no Level 3 PM filter is available for your engine, then any Level 2 PM filter (reduces PM by 50%) is acceptable. Furthermore, if no Level 2 or Level 3 PM filters are suitable for your vehicle, then you can apply for an annual extension. You must apply four months prior to the compliance deadline for your PM filter requirements. Annual extensions can be granted until January 1, 2018, at which time the engine or vehicle must be replaced.

Note: Level 1 PM filters (reduces PM by 25%) cannot be used to comply with the regulation.

For more information on PM filter availability and extensions, we recommended that you read the
Truck and Bus Regulation PM Filter Availability and Extensions Summary.

9. Are any vehicles exempt from the Truck and Bus Regulation?

Certain vehicles are exempt from the Truck and Bus Regulation, and are not subject to any requirements. Examples include certain personal trucks with a pick-up bed used exclusively for personal use, motorhomes, emergency vehicles, historic vehicles, and military tactical vehicles. Please see Page 1, Section C of the
Truck and Bus Regulation for the entire list of exempt vehicles.


The regulation does not apply to publically owned vehicles (except school buses), solid waste collection vehicles, urban buses, transit fleet vehicles, and certain two-engine vehicles (covered in off-road). These are already subject to other in-use regulations and do not need to comply with this regulation. Drayage trucks, which are diesel-fueled trucks that transport marine cargo, containers or transport chassis to and from ports or rail yards, are also excluded from the Truck and Bus Regulation until January 1, 2023.

10. What is meant by the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR)?

The gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) is assigned by the vehicle manufacturer or finisher. Please note that the GVWR on your DMV paperwork may not be accurate, and should not be reported. The GVWR required for the regulation represents the maximum weight of the vehicle and what it can carry when fully loaded. The GVWR includes the weight of the vehicle itself plus fuel, passengers, cargo, and trailer tongue weight. The label that identifies the GVWR is typically located on the driver's door post. This weight is NOT the same as the unladed weight, gross combined weight rating, or DMV registration weight rating. This GVWR cannot be changed regardless of vehicle modifications. For more information on GVWR as defined by the Truck and Bus Regulation, please see Vehicle Code Section 350. We recommend that you check out our GVWR video and GVWR webpage.

11. How do I determine my engine model year?

The engine model year can be found on the engine label inside the engine compartment, usually on the engine block. This engine label is referred to as the engine’s emission control label (ECL). An ECL is required on every 1974 or newer diesel vehicle over 6,000 pounds. If the ECL is missing or not readable, call your local engine distributor or the engine manufacturer with the engine serial number to obtain the model year AND to have the label replaced. Typically, the engine model is one year older than the chassis model year. For example, a 2007 vehicle typically has a 2006 model year engine installed.

A standard rebuilt engine is considered the same emissions level as the original configuration. For example, if a 1996 model year engine was rebuilt in 2011, it would still be considered a 1996 model year engine.

Also, please note that you cannot replace your engine with an engine older than the original manufactured date. For example, if your original vehicle was manufactured with a 2006 engine, you cannot replace the 2006 engine with a 2005 engine.

Check out our ECL video and ECL webpage for informations and photos of labels.

14. Can I split my fleet up to use either the Particulate Matter (PM) Filter Phase-In Option or the Small Fleet Option?

PM (particulate matter) Filter Phase-In Option

You cannot split your fleet and assign some vehicles to the engine model year schedule and other vehicles to the PM Filter Phase-in Option, except where a company has separate divisions or subsidiaries.

Small Fleet Option

No, you cannot split up your fleet to take advantage of the Small Fleet Option. You are not a small fleet if you have 4 or more diesel vehicles with a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) greater than 14,000 lbs under common ownership and control even if they are in different companies. For example, if you own two separate businesses with 2 trucks each, then none of the businesses can claim the small fleet option because you have common ownership in both companies. Each company must still comply separately using the engine model year schedule or report if using a flexibility option such as the Phase-In Option to comply.

15. What is common ownership or control?

Common Ownership or Control means being owned or managed day to day by the same person(s), corporation, partnership, or association. Vehicles managed by the same directors, officers, or managers, or by corporations controlled by the same majority stockholders are considered to be under common ownership or control even if their title is held by different business entities.

Additionally, the total number of vehicles under common ownership or control, even if outside California, needs to be considered when determining eligibility for the Small Fleet Option. For example, if you own or have common ownership and control of 50 trucks and only three trucks operate in California, you are not considered a small fleet. However, only the three vehicles that come into California are subject to Truck and Bus regulation requirements.

If you own your truck, regardless of whether you contract for your own loads or have a leasing arrangement with a motor carrier and operate under their authority, you are considered a small fleet, and can use the Small Fleet Option.

17. How will the Truck and Bus Regulation be enforced?

A. When will you begin enforcing the Truck and Bus Regulation? Can I get a ticket today?
The Truck and Bus particulate matter (PM) filter requirements went into effect on January 1, 2012 and are now being fully enforced by ARB. Vehicles in violation of the regulation can be issued citations that carry penalties. However, ARB will use discretion in enforcing the regulation in order to account for mitigating circumstances (e.g., good faith efforts to comply with the regulation). You may contact the Enforcement Division if you have any further questions.

B. How much is the fine?
Heavier vehicles (those greater than 26,000 pounds GVWR) that are not in compliance with the Truck and Bus regulation face penalties that start at a minimum of $1,000 per violation per month, and will increase significantly over time. The actual amount of a fine can vary depending on mitigating circumstances.

C. How will ARB enforce the regulation?
ARB will enforce the regulation at CHP weigh stations and other random roadside locations, distribution centers, fleet facilities, truck stops and other locations where trucks and buses are present.

D. What do I do now if my vehicle is out of compliance?
You should make every effort to come into compliance with the regulation as quickly as possible. If you have already been cited for a violation of the regulation, then the sooner you act, the lower the penalties you face. You cannot legally operate a vehicle in the state of California that is subject to, but out of compliance with a regulation. The more you operate a vehicle in the State that does not comply with a regulation, the greater the risk of being cited for a violation of the regulation. It is the choice of the vehicle owner whether to continue to operate a non-compliant vehicle in the State.

E. Where can I find more information?
You can find more information about enforcement related actions, inspection videos, and learn about penalties and sanctions on the TruckStop Enforcement webpage.


Link icon Truck and Bus Reporting, TRUCRS FAQs

1. Am I required to report for the Truck and Bus Regulation? (Click on the question to see the answer)

(If windows are not fully opening, click control and minus sign (ctrl -) to reduce font size.)

Diesel truck and bus owners that comply with the engine model year schedules and do not plan to use credits, exemptions, or extensions do not need to report. However, owners that report by certain deadlines can take advantage of flexibility options in the regulation.

The following is a summary of who should have reported by March 30, 2012:

  1. Small fleet owners (with three or fewer diesel vehicles) that have heavier vehicles with 1996 to 1999 model year engines. For additional engine model year reporting requirements see the Small Fleet Options FAQ.
  2. All owners that choose to use the Phase-In Option, along with the associated credits (downsizing credits, early compliance credits, credits for adding cleaner vehicles).
  3. Contractors and other owners that have low mileage construction trucks including single truck owners.
  4. Fleets using the low-use, log truck or NOx exempt flexibility options.
  5. Annual odometer reading as of January 1, 2012 for agricultural fleets and hour meter readings for fleets with two-engine street sweepers with tier 0 secondary engines over 50 hp.

Lighter vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating from 14,001 to 26,000 lbs. are typically not required to report. Clean-up requirements for lighter vehicles begin January 1, 2015.

Note: If you missed a previous reporting deadline, see question 2 below.

2. What if I missed the reporting deadline?

Fleets with 1-3 vehicles:

If you own a small fleet with 3 or fewer vehicles, and you own a heavier truck with a 1996 to 1999 model year engine, you can still report to take advantage of the Small Fleet Option until January 1, 2014. However, you may be subject to enforcement actions. See the Small Fleet Options FAQ for more details about the Small Fleet Option.

All other fleets:

A. For fleets that did not report by March 30, 2012, but were in compliance with either the Engine Model Year Schedule or the Phase-In Option since January 1, 2012, may still report vehicles and use the You can find a comprehensive overview of the Truck & Bus Reporting System in the reporting 2014 Reporting Guide.

See our helpful Truck and Bus Reporting System instructional videoss.

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5. What is a Truck and Bus TRUCRS ID?

For the Truck and Bus Reporting System, a TRUCRS ID (identification number) will be a unique number assigned to your particular company (or owner). If you are reporting for multiple subsidiaries or companies, then you can enter each subsidiary or company separately. A TRUCRS ID will be issued for each subsidiary or company reported in your account.

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6. I am having trouble viewing the reporting system. The webpage does not seem to be saving my information and/or I am unable to create an account. What do I do?

First, you need to know what internet browser you are using. An internet browser is the program you use to access the internet. The Truck and Bus Reporting System is designed to work with Microsoft Internet Explorer or Mozilla Firefox web browsers. Other web browsers may not be compatible. If the yellow navigation buttons are not visible when you log on, then you are likely using an unsupported web browser.

The reporting system is not designed to work with smart phones, PDAs, IPads and other similar technologies.

In addition, if you are using an older version of Internet Explorer and the yellow buttons are frozen, try clicking on the Compatibility Mode button on the address bar.

7. Where in the reporting system do I indicate I am taking advantage of the Small Fleet Option, the Phase-in Option or the "All-In" Extension Credit?

You simply need to report all your fleet information. If you meet the criteria for credits (and reported by the applicable deadline), they will automatically be considered towards compliance. ARB takes into consideration all possible compliance pathways including the Engine Model Year Schedules, Phase-in Option, or flexibility options, when determining fleet compliance.

8. The Truck and Bus Reporting System is asking me for my   A. GVWR,   B. engine family number,  C. permit numbers, etc.
Where do I get this information?

  1. GVWR - The gross vehicle weight rating is assigned by the vehicle manufacturer or finisher.  Please note that the GVWR on your DMV paperwork may not be accurate, and should not be reported. The GVWR required by the regulation represents the maximum weight of the vehicle and what it can carry when fully loaded. The GVWR includes the weight of the vehicle itself plus fuel, passengers, cargo, and trailer tongue weight. The label that identifies the GVWR is typically located on the driver's door post. The GVWR is not the same as the unladed weight, gross combined weight rating, or registered weight rating. This number cannot be changed regardless of vehicle modifications. For more information on GVWR as defined by the Truck and Bus regulation, please see Vehicle Code Section 350.

Check out our GVWR webpage and video for more information and photos.

    1. Engine Family Number – The engine family number can be found on the emission control label. An emission control label is required to be affixed to all engines 1974 and newer that were federally certified. An ECL will often indicate that an engine “meets US EPA/California emission standards” or “important engine information.” The label will typically indicate the model year of the engine as well as the engine family number. Contact your local engine dealer or the manufacturer to get a replacement label should yours be missing or illegible—you will need to provide your engine serial number.

If you own a rebuilt or remanufactured engine, please note that while rebuilt engines keep their original identity and engine serial number, remanufactured engines may lose their original serial number and will instead have an engine label identifying it as a remanufactured engine. Please contact your local installer, dealer, and/or manufacturer for more information. Check out our ECL webpage and video for more information and photos.

    1. Permit Numbers – Typically a California Department of Transportation Number or United States Department of Transportation Number indicate your operating authority. Depending on specific operations, a company may have multiple numbers or none at all. Including this optional information will facilitate future fleet search and find capabilities in the Reporting System.

 

9. Am I responsible for bringing my leased vehicles into compliance?

In general the rental or leasing entity is responsible to bring the vehicle into compliance. Any contract that a lessor and lessee enter into that has an effective date of January 1, 2010 or later shall clearly specify whether or not the leased vehicle is to be excluded from the lessor’s fleet for the duration of the lease, or the responsibility will be that of the lessee. Therefore, the lessee or operator is responsible if the lease agreement is longer than one year, and the terms of the lease define the lessee or operator of the vehicle as responsible for compliance with state laws. To determine your specific requirements for the Truck and Bus regulation, refer to the Truck and Bus Frequently Asked Questions above.

    1. If I am leased with a company do I have to include their information when I report? What if I am an owner operator?

If your company is considered a separate legal entity, you should report separately but cannot use the Small Fleet Option if there are more than 3 diesel vehicles under common ownership. If you are a single owner operator who has a lease with another company, you are generally considered a small fleet and will report your company information separately as required.

    1. I am a company that leases to multiple operators, what do I need to do? Can I report for them?

A broker carrier could report to assist their owner-operators but each owner operator would generally be reported separately with a unique TRUCRS ID for each.

Single vehicle owners whose services are leased to another company (and potentially operate under their authority) are generally considered small fleets if they either hold the title of the vehicle or would be considered a separate legal entity. Because of the wide variety of operating relationships, ARB encourages fleets to consult legal counsel if you are unsure how your specific situation would be categorized.

Any in-state or out-of-state motor carrier, California broker, or any California resident who operates or directs the operation of any vehicle subject to this regulation shall verify that each hired or dispatched vehicle is in compliance with the regulation and comply with the record keeping requirements of the Truck and Bus Regulation (Reporting Requirements).

10. I have multiple subsidiaries that I want to report as one fleet. How do I do this?

A company can subdivide their fleets for reporting purposes if there are different subsidiaries, divisions, or organizational structures like location or managers. The reporting system allows one user to create and manage multiple fleets (each fleet would be assigned a separate TRUCRS ID).

A fleet with multiple operations can report together, if they want. A company can also report all of their vehicles together as a single entity and would use the Corporate Parent/Owner as the vehicle owner. If you own two companies and want to report as a single fleet, then you can do so.

11. I've previously reported to TRUCRS, what do I do now?

For the Truck and Bus regulation, you may have previously reported for a flexibility option requiring annual odometer readings. Examples: Agricultural Vehicle Provision, Low Mileage Construction Truck Provision, Low Use Vehicle Exemption, Street Sweepers with Tier 0 secondary engines over fifty horsepower. If you are taking advantage of a flexibility option requiring annual odometer readings, be sure to update your fleet status every year.

Also, it is important that you if you made any changes to your fleet such as changing compliance options, installing a filter, upgrading or replacing a vehicle, you must update your fleet in TRUCRS and report all changes.

12. Can I log on with my DOORS ID from the Off-Road Reporting System? Do I need to enter my fleet information again?

If you have a DOORS ID, you can log onto the Truck and Bus Reporting System and receive a TRUCRS ID. Data in the reporting system is separate, however. Remember to only report your On-Road Vehicles applicable to the Truck and Bus Regulation for the Truck and Bus Reporting System (All reporting systems menu).

13. Is additional online help available?

Additional links to resources:

These resources are also available on the front page of the reporting system and on TruckStop.

Reporting System for the Truck and Bus Regulation called TRUCRS

Online reporting guide (pdf)

How to report video (mp4)

Where is the engine model year, engine family name, emission control label?

Where is the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR)?

new tag Truck and Bus Regulation example fleets for owners of 1 to 3 trucks or buses