ARB Research Seminar

This page updated May 20, 2013

Summary of the CalNex-San Joaquin Valley Air Quality Study (Bakersfield -- Early Summer of 2010)

Photo of Ronald C. Cohen, Ph.D., and Allen H. Goldstein, Ph.D.

Ronald C. Cohen, Ph.D., Director, Berkeley Atmospheric Science Center, Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, and Allen H. Goldstein, Ph.D., Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

April 22, 2013
Cal EPA Headquarters, 1001 "I" Street, Sacramento, CA

Introduction
Presentation: 1. 2.
Video: 1. 2.
Research Project: 1. 2.
Interview

Overview

The CalNex 2010 Study was coordinated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB).  It attracted researchers from across the USA and from around the world.  The primary objective was to make critical air quality measurements by air, land, and sea to better understand atmospheric processes and what has happened, what will likely happen and how might the emission control efforts of two major programs impact each other?  One of the two comprehensive ground-level monitoring sites was located in Bakersfield in the southern San Joaquin Valley.  Today’s seminar summarizes the activities and results from this monitoring effort.


PART I - Morning Session: Characterization of the Atmospheric Chemistry in the Southern San Joaquin Valley

Ronald C. Cohen and Allen H. Goldstein

The primary objective of this project was to make ambient measurements of a wide range of pollutants to better understand why ozone and aerosol air quality in the southern San Joaquin Valley is among the worst in the country and is improving slowly.

The research focus of this presenter, Ron Cohen, has been to develop and apply new experimental and modeling strategies for understanding the chemical composition of the Earth’s atmosphere now, in the past, and for predicting future changes.  A major focus is on the role of nitrogen oxides.  Laboratory, ground-based, airborne, and space-based measurements are combined with modeling to better understand their residence times, their impacts on oxidants (both regionally and globally), and their interactions with the biosphere and atmosphere.

PART II - Afternoon Session: Hourly In-Situ Quantitation of Organic Aerosol Marker Compounds during CalNex 2010

Allen H. Goldstein

The primary objective of this project was to make ~hourly measurements of organic aerosols and to analyze them chemically and statistically to better understand their composition and sources in the southern San Joaquin Valley.

The research focus of this presenter, Allen Goldstein, has been to develop new instrumentation to address air quality research needs, to conduct long- and short-term biosphere-atmosphere exchange experiments, and utilize models of atmospheric processes, all with the goal of understanding the chemical composition of the Earth’s atmosphere, how it functions, and how it is impacted by anthropogenic emissions and a changing climate.  A major focus is on the roles of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the formation of secondary organic aerosols, and their impacts on the biosphere and atmosphere.

Speaker Biography

Ronald C. Cohen, Ph.D., is Director of the Berkeley Atmospheric Science Center and Professor of Chemistry and of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Berkeley.  Dr. Cohen's research interests are in the field of atmospheric chemistry — a chemical perspective on the effects of human activity on the Earth's atmosphere and on exchanges between the atmosphere and biosphere.  Professor Cohen's research focuses on developing and applying new experimental and modeling strategies for understanding the chemical composition of the Earth's atmosphere now and in the past and for predicting future changes. Current research focuses on the role of nitrogen oxides and on the isotopes of water. Laboratory, ground-based, airborne and space-based measurements are combined with modeling to understand the atmospheric residence time of nitrogen oxides, their impact on oxidants on regional and global scales, their interactions with the biosphere and their consequences for aerosol properties. Laboratory and field studies of water isotopes are used to understand cloud properties and to diagnose the regional and global behavior of the hydrologic cycle. Development of instrumentation that permits detection of previously unobserved chemicals or those chemicals whose distribution is poorly quantified continues to be at the core of this research prograam.  Professor Cohen has been on the UC Berkeley faculty since 1995 and was a Visiting Professor at the Max Planck Institute for one year.  Dr. Cohen is also serving as the Editor for the open access journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.

Allen H. Goldstein, Ph.D., is Professor in the Departments of Environmental Science, Policy and Management and Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley.  Professor Goldstein's research themes include atmospheric chemistry and biogeochemistry. His research group investigates anthropogenic and natural contributions to the chemical composition of the troposphere, interactions of air pollution with ecosystems, aerosol composition and chemistry, and the biogeochemistry of greenhouse gases and stratospheric ozone depleting gases.  A unifying theme is to understand the balance between natural and anthropogenic sources of trace gases and aerosols in earth's atmosphere, and to elucidate the biogeochemical processes which control their budgets. One of our major foci is to push the forefront of observational capabilities through the development and deployment of novel analytical instrumentation, making possible new avenues of research to address elusive scientific questions.  Professor Goldstein has been on the UC Berkeley faculty since 1996 and was a Visiting Professor in Australia for one year.


For a complete listing of the ARB Research Seminars and the related documentation
for the seminars please view the Main Seminars web page

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