ARB Research Seminar

This page updated June 19, 2013

Toxicity of Source-Oriented Ambient Submicron Particulate Matter

Photo of Anthony S. Wexler, Ph.D., Kent Pinkerton, Ph.D., and Keith Bein, Ph.D.Photo of Anthony S. Wexler, Ph.D., Kent Pinkerton, Ph.D., and Keith Bein, Ph.D.Photo of Anthony S. Wexler, Ph.D., Kent Pinkerton, Ph.D., and Keith Bein, Ph.D.

Anthony S. Wexler, Ph.D., Civil and Environmental Engineering and Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources and Director, Air Quality Research Center and Crocker Nuclear Laboratory, University of California, Davis, Kent Pinkerton, Ph.D., Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, and Keith Bein, Ph.D., Air Quality Research Center and Crocker Nuclear Laboratory

February 19, 2013
Cal EPA Headquarters, 1001 "I" Street, Sacramento, CA

Introduction
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Overview

Evidence from the scientific literature has shown that exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) can be associated with premature death and hospitalization.  However, it is unclear which components are the most responsible for the adverse health effects, since ambient PM is mixture of components derived from a wide range of sources and from atmospheric processes that may alter toxicity. The main goal of this study was to examine toxicity characteristics of PM or PM components derived from different source categories and atmospheric processes. PM samples were collected and concentrated based on source- and atmospheric process-related chemical compositions during two seasons (winter and summer) and at two size points (ultrafine and submicron fine). Mice were then exposed to the isolated PM samples and studied for possible toxicity. The results showed that among summer PM samples those containing metals or originating from local vehicular emissions had the higher biological responses.  Among the winter samples, highly processed regional background PM, PM from nighttime inversions, or  PM from local vehicular emissions had  higher biological responses.  In addition, ultrafine PM was found to have higher biological responses than submicron fine PM on a per mass basis.

This study was funded jointly by the Air Resources Board and the Electric Power Research Institute.

Speaker Biography

Anthony Wexler, Ph.D., is a Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Land, Air and Water Resources. Dr. Wexler is also the Director of the Air Quality Research Center and Crocker Nuclear Laboratory. He is the former president of the American Association for Aerosol Research was the Director of USEPA’s San Joaquin Valley Aerosol Health Effects Research Center (SAHERC). He currently on editorial board of Atmospheric Environment.

Kent Pinkerton, Ph.D., is a Professor of Pediatrics in the School of Medicine and Professor of Anatomy, Physiology and Cell Biology in the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Pinkerton is Director of the Center for Health and the Environment and Co-Director of the Western Center for Agricultural Health and Safety at UC Davis.  Dr. Pinkerton was the co-director of the SAHERC at UC Davis and served as Chair of the Environmental and Occupational Health Assembly and Chair of the Environmental Health Policy Committee for the American Thoracic Society.  Professor Pinkerton currently serves on the editorial board of Inhalation Toxicology.

Keith Bein, Ph.D., is an Assistant Research Scientist at the Air Quality Research Center and Crocker Nuclear Laboratory and a member of the Research Faculty at the Center for Health and the Environment at the University of California, Davis.


For a complete listing of the ARB Research Seminars and the related documentation
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