Research Projects

Project at a Glance

Project Status: complete

Title: Chronic respiratory disease symptom effects of long-term cumulative exposure to ambient levels of total suspended particulate (TSP), total oxidants, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide in California

Principal Investigator / Author(s): Abbey, David E.

Contractor: Loma Linda University

Contract Number: A013032, A7-176-30 & A8-147-31


Research Program Area: Health & Exposure

Topic Areas: Health Effects of Air Pollution


Abstract:

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease symptom effects of long-term cumulative exposure to ambient levels of total suspended particulate total oxidants, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide in California. Gary L. Euler, Dr. P. H., RRT, David E. Abbey, Ph.D., John E. Hodgkin, M.D., Allan R. Magie, Ph.D. (Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA 92350). To assess the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease symptoms due to long-term exposure to ambient levels of total suspended particulates (TSP), total oxidants, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (N02), symptoms were as certained using the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute respiratory symptoms questionnaire (NHLBI) on 7,445 Seventh-Day Adventist non-smokers, 2.5 years of age and older, who lived eleven years or longer in areas ranging from high to low photochemical air pollution in California. Participant cumulative exposures to each pollutant in excess of four thresholds were estimated using monthly residence zip code histories and interpolated dosages from state air-monitoring stations. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted for pollutants individually and, together with eight covariables including passive smoking. Statistically significant associations with chronic symptoms were seen for :L ) SO2 exposure above 4 pphm, (p = r1.03), relative risk 1.18 for 500 h/yr of exposure: 2) total oxidants above 10 pphm, (p < 0.004) relative risk of 1 -20 far 750 h/yr and 3) total suspended particulates (TSP) above 200 m g/m3 (p < 0.OOOOl), relative risk of 1.22 for 750 h/yr. When these pollutant exposures were entered together, TSP was the only one showing statistical significance, (p < 0.01). It appeared that TSR may be a surrogate measure of the mix of pollutants. Chronic respiratory disease symptoms were not found to be associated with the relatively low levels of NO, exposure in this population.


 

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