SOUTH COAST AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

RULE 2012 - ATTACHMENTS


ATTACHMENT A - 1N PROCEDURE

ATTACHMENT B - BIAS TEST

ATTACHMENT C - QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES (Amended April 9, 1999)

ATTACHMENT D - EQUIPMENT TUNING PROCEDURES

ATTACHMENT E - LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

ATTACHMENT F - DEFINITIONS

ATTACHMENT G - SUPPLEMENTAL AND ALTERNATIVE CEMS PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR LOW NOX CONCENTRATIONS



TABLE OF CONTENTS
ATTACHMENT A - 1N PROCEDURE

A. Applicability

B. Procedure

A. APPLICABILITY

  1. This procedure may be used to provide substitute data for affected sources that meet the specified conditions in Chapter 2, Subdivision E, Paragraph 1, Subparagraph b, Clause i, Chapter 2, Subdivision E, Paragraph 2, Subparagraph b, Clause i, and Chapter 3, Subdivision I, Paragraph 2, Subparagraph a.

B. PROCEDURE

  1. Where N is the number of hours of missing emissions data, determine the substitute hourly NOX concentration (in ppmv), or the hourly flow rate (in scfh) by averaging the measured or substituted values for the 1N hours immediately before the missing data period and the 1N hours immediately after the missing data period.

  2. Where 1N hours before or after the missing data period includes a missing data hour, the substituted value previously recorded for such hour(s) pursuant to the missing data procedure shall be used to determine the average in accordance with Subdivision B, Paragraph 1 above.

  3. Substitute the calculated average value for each hour of the N hours of missing data.

EXAMPLES OF 1 N PROCEDURE

EXAMPLE 1

HOUR

DATA POINT (LB/HR)

1:00 A.M.

30

2:00 A.M.

25

3:00 A.M.

32

4:00 A.M.

34

5:00 A.M.

Missing

6:00 A.M.

Missing

7:00 A.M.

Missing

8:00 A.M.

27

9:00 A.M.

22

10:00 A.M.

25

11:00 A.M.

30

1:00 A.M.

30

2:00 A.M.

25

3:00 A.M.

32

4:00 A.M.

34

5:00 A.M.

27.5

6:00 A.M.

27.5

7:00 A.M.

27.5

8:00 A.M.

27

9:00 A.M.

22

10:00 A.M.

25

11:00 A.M.

30

To fill in the missing three hours, take the data points from the 3 hours before and the 3 hours after the missing data period to determine an average emission over the 3 hours

                      25 + 32 + 34 + 27 + 22 + 25

average emissions =  -----------------------------  =  27.5 lb/hr.

                                  6

EXAMPLES OF 1 N PROCEDURE

EXAMPLE 2

HOUR

DATA POINT (LB/HR)

1:00 A.M.

45

2:00 A.M.

50

3:00 A.M.

53

4:00 A.M.

Missing

5:00 A.M.

Missing

6:00 A.M.

Missing

7:00 A.M.

58

8:00 A.M.

Missing

9:00 A.M.

48

10:00 A.M.

45

1:00 A.M.

45

2:00 A.M.

50

3:00 A.M.

53

4:00 A.M.

Missing

5:00 A.M.

Missing

6:00 A.M.

Missing

7:00 A.M.

58

8:00 A.M.

53

9:00 A.M.

48

10:00 A.M.

45

In this example the missing data point at 8 A.M. is in the 3-hour period after the 3- hour missing data period. We first fill the 8.A.M. slot.

                                 58 + 48

average emissions for 8 A.M.  = ---------  =  53

                                    2

The filled in data sheet at this point should read as follows:

The average for the three hour missing data period is:

 

                       45 + 50 + 53 + 58 + 53 + 48

average emissions  =  -----------------------------  =  51.2

                                    6


(Amended February 14, 1997)

ATTACHMENT B
BIAS TEST

The bias of the data shall be determined based on the relative accuracy (RA) test data sets and the relative accuracy (RATA) test audit data sets for NOX pollutant concentration monitors, fuel gas sulfur content monitors, flow monitors, and emission rate measurement systems using the procedures outlined below.

  1. Calculate the mean of the difference using Equation 2-1 of 40 CFR, Part 60, Appendix B, Performance Specification 2. To calculate bias for a NOX pollutant concentration monitor, "d" shall, for each paired data point, be the difference between the NOX concentration values (in ppmv) obtained from the reference method and the monitor. To calculate bias for a flow monitor, "d" shall, for each paired data point, be the difference between the flow rate values (in scfh) obtained from the reference method and the monitor. To calculate bias for an emission rate measurement system, "d" shall, for each paired data point, be the difference between the emission rate values (in lb/hr) obtained from the reference method and the monitoring system.

  2. Calculate the standard deviation, Sd, of the data set using Equation 2-2 of 40 CFR, Part 60, Appendix B, Performance Specification 2.

  3. Calculate the confidence coefficient, cc, of the data set using Equation 2-3 of 40 CFR, Part 60, Appendix B, Performance Specification 2.

  4. The monitor passes the bias test if it meets either of the following criteria:

    a. the absolute value of the mean difference is less than |cc|.

    b. the absolute value of the mean difference is less than 1 ppmv.

  5. Alternatively, if the monitoring device fails to meet the bias test requirement, the Facility Permit holder may choose to use the bias adjustment procedure as follows:

    a. If the CEMS is biased high relative to the reference method, no correction will be applied.

    b. If the CEMS is biased low relative to the reference method, the data shall be corrected for bias using the following procedure:

    CEMiadjusted = CEMimonitored x BAF (Eq. B-1)

    where:

    CEMiadjusted = Data value adjusted for bias at time i.

    CEMimonitored = Data provided by the CEMS at time i.

    BAF = Bias Adjustment Factor

    BAF = 1 + (|d|/CEM) (Eq. B-2)

    where:

    d = Arithmetic mean of the difference between the CEMS and the reference method measurements during the determination of the bias.

    CEM = Mean of the data values provided by the CEMS during the determination of bias.

    If the bias test failed in a multi-level RA or RATA, calculate the BAF for each operating level. Apply the largest BAF obtained to correct for the CEM data output using equation B-1. The facility permit holder shall have the option to apply this adjustment to either all directly monitored data or to emission rates from the time and date of the failed bias test until the date and time of a RATA that does not show bias. These adjusted values shall be used in all forms of missing data computation, and in calculating the mass emission rate.

    The BAF is unique for each CEMS. If backup CEMS is used, any BAF applied to primary CEMS shall be applied to the backup CEMS unless there are RATA data for the backup CEMS within the previous year.

    If the BAF changes during a RATA, the new BAF must be applied to the emissions data from the time and date of the RATA until the time and date of the next RATA.



    (Amended February 14, 1997)(Amended April 9, 1999)

    ATTACHMENT C - QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES

    A. Quality Control Program

    B. Frequency of Testing

    A. Quality Control Program

    Develop and implement a quality control program for the continuous emission monitoring systems and their components. As a minimum, include in each quality control program a written plan that describes in detail complete, step-by-step procedures and operations for each of the following activities:

    1. Calibration Error Test Procedures

      Identify calibration error test procedures specific to the CEMS that may require variance from the procedures used during certification (for example, how the gases are to be injected, adjustments of flow rates and pressures, introduction of reference values, length of time for injection of calibration gases, steps for obtaining calibration error, determination of interferences, and when calibration adjustments should be made).

    2. Calibration and Linearity Adjustments

      Explain how each component of the CEMS will be adjusted to provide correct responses to calibration gases, reference values, and/or indications of interference both initially and after repairs or corrective action. Identify equations, conversion factors, assumed moisture content, and other factors affecting calibration of each CEMS.

    3. Preventative Maintenance

      Keep a written record of procedures, necessary to maintain the CEMS in proper operating condition and a schedule for those procedures.

    4. Audit Procedures

      Keep copies of written reports received from testing firms/laboratories of procedures and details specific to the installed CEMS that were to be used by the testing firms/laboratories for relative accuracy test audits, such as sampling and analysis methods. The testing firms/laboratories shall have received approval from the District by going through the District's laboratory approval program.

    5. Record Keeping Procedures

      Keep a written record describing procedures that will be used to implement the record keeping and reporting requirements.

      Specific provisions of Section A-3 and A-5 above of the quality control programs shall constitute specific guidelines for facility personnel. However facilities shall be required to take reasonable steps to monitor and assure implementation of such specific guidelines. Such reasonable steps may include periodic audits, issuance of periodic reminders, implementing training classes, discipline of employees as necessary, and other appropriate measures. Steps that a facility commits to take to monitor and assure implementation of the specific guidelines shall be set forth in the written plan and shall be the only elements of Section A-3 and A-5 that constitute enforceable requirements under the written plan, unless other program provisions are independently enforceable pursuant to other requirements of the NOx protocols or District or federal rules or regulations.

    B. FREQUENCY OF TESTING

    There are three situations which will result in an out-of-control period. These include failure of a calibration error test, failure of a relative accuracy test audit, and failure of a BIAS test, and are detailed in this subdivision. Data collected by a CEMS during an out-of-control period shall not be considered valid.

    The frequency at which each quality assurance test must be performed is an follows:

    1. Periodic Assessments

      For each monitor or CEMS, perform the following assessments during each day in which the unit combusts any fuel or processes any material (hereafter referred to as a "unit operating day"), or for a monitor or a CEMS on a bypass stack/duct, on each day during which emissions pass through the bypass stack or duct. These requirements are effective as of the date when the monitor or CEMS completes certification testing.

        a. Calibration Error Testing Requirements for Pollutant Concentration Monitors and O2 Monitors

        Test, record, and compute the calibration error of each NOx pollutant concentration monitor and O2 monitor at least once on each unit operating day, or for monitors or monitoring systems on bypass stacks/ducts on each day that emissions pass through the bypass stack or duct. Conduct calibration error checks, to the extent practicable, approximately 24 hours apart. Perform the daily calibration error test according to the procedure in Paragraph B.1.a.ii. of this Attachment.

        For units with more than one span range, perform the daily calibration error test on each scale that has been used since the last calibration error test. For example, if the emissions concentration has not exceeded the low-scale span range since the previous calendar day, the calibration error test may be performed on the low-scale only. If, however, the emissions concentration has exceeded the low-scale span range since the previous calibration error test, perform the calibration error test on both the low- and high-scales

        i. Design Requirements for Calibration Error Testing of NOx Concentration Monitors and O2 Monitors

        Design and equip each NOx concentration monitor and O2 monitor with a calibration gas injection port that allows a check of the entire measurement system when calibration gases are introduced. For extractive and dilution type monitors, all monitoring components exposed to the sample gas, (for example, sample lines, filters, scrubbers, conditioners, and as much of the probe as practical) are included in the measurement system. For in situ type monitors, the calibration must check against the injected gas for the performance of all electronic and optical components (for example, transmitter, receiver, analyzer).

        Design and equip each pollutant concentration monitor and O2 monitor to allow daily determinations of calibration error (positive or negative) at the zero-level (0 to 20 percent of each span range) and high-level (80 to 100 percent of each span range) concentrations.

        ii. Calibration Error Test for NOx Concentration Monitors and O2 Monitors

        Measure the calibration error of each NOx concentration analyzer and O2 monitor once each day according to the following procedures:

        If any manual or automatic adjustments to the monitor settings are made, conduct the calibration error test in a way that the magnitude of the adjustments can be determined and recorded.

        Perform calibration error tests at two concentrations: (1) zero-level and (2) high level. Zero level is 0 to 20 percent of each span range, and high level is 80 to 100 percent of each span range. All calibration gases used during certification tests and quality assurance and quality control activities shall be NIST/EPA approved standard reference materials (SRM), certified reference materials (CRM), or shall be certified according to "EPA Traceability Protocol for Assay and Certification of Gaseous Calibration Standards," September 1997, EPA 600/R-979/121 or any subsequent version published by EPA.

        Introduce the calibration gas at the gas injection port as specified above. Operate each monitor in its normal sampling mode. For extractive and dilution type monitors, pass the audit gas through all filters, scrubbers, conditioners, and other monitor components used during normal sampling and through as much of the sampling probe as practical. For in situ type monitors, perform calibration checking all active electronic and optical components, including the transmitter, receiver, and analyzer. Challenge the NOx concentration monitors and the O2 monitors once with each gas. Record the monitor response from the data acquisition and handling system. Use the following equation to determine the calibration error at each concentration once each day:

        CE =

        |R-A|

        x 100

        (Eq. C-1)

           

        S

           
        Where:
        CE = The percentage calibration error based on the span range
        R = The reference value of zero- or high-level calibration gas introduced into the monitoring system.
        A = The actual monitoring system response to the calibration gas.
        S = The span range of the instrument

        b. Calibration Error Testing Requirements for Stack Flow Monitors

        Test, compute, and record the calibration error of each stack flow monitor at least once within every 14 calendar day period during which at anytime emissions flow through the stack; or for monitors or monitoring systems on bypass stacks or ducts, at least once within every 14 calendar day period during which at anytime emissions flow through the bypass stack or duct. Introduce a zero reference value to the transducer or transmitter. Record flow monitor output from the data acquisition and handling systems before and after any adjustments. Calculate the calibration error using the following equation :

        CE =

        | R - A |

        x 100

        (Eq. C-2)

           

        S

           
        Where:    
        CE = Percentage calibration error based on the span range
        R = Zero reference value introduced into the. transducer or transmitter.
        A = Actual monitoring system response.
        S = Span range of the flow monitor.

        c. Interference Check for Stack Flow Monitors

        Perform the daily flow monitor interference checks specified in Paragraph B.1.c.i. of this Attachment at least once per operating day (when the unit(s) operate for any part of the day).

        i. Design Requirements for Flow Monitor Interference Checks

        Design and equip each flow monitor with a means to ensure that the moisture expected to occur at the monitoring location does not interfere with the proper functioning of the flow monitoring system. Design and equip each flow monitor with a means to detect, on at least a daily basis, pluggage of each sample line and sensing port, and malfunction of each resistance temperature detector (RTD), transceiver, or equivalent.

        Design and equip each differential pressure flow monitor to provide (1) an automatic, periodic backpurging (simultaneously on both sides of the probe) or equivalent method of sufficient force and frequency to keep the probe and lines sufficiently free of obstructions on at least a daily basis to prevent sensing interference, and (2) a means to detecting leaks in the system at least on a quarterly basis (a manual check is acceptable).

        Design and equip each thermal flow monitor with a means to ensure on at least a daily basis that the probe remains sufficiently clean to prevent velocity sensing interference.

        Design and equip each ultrasonic flow monitor with a means to ensure on at least a daily basis that the transceivers remain sufficiently clean (for example, backpurging the system) to prevent velocity sensing interference.

        d. Recalibration

        Adjust the calibration, at a minimum, whenever the calibration error exceeds the limits of the applicable performance specification for the NOx monitor, O2 monitor or stack flow monitor to meet such specifications. Repeat the calibration error test procedure following the adjustment or repair to demonstrate that the corrective actions were effective. Document the adjustments made.

        e. Out-of-Control Period - Calibration Test

        An out-of-control period occurs when the calibration error of an NOx concentration monitor exceeds 5.0 percent based upon the span range value, when the calibration error of an O2 monitor exceeds 1.0 percent O2, or when the calibration error of a flow monitor exceeds 6.0 percent based upon the span range value, which is twice the applicable specification. The out-of-control period begins with the hour of completion of the failed calibration error test and ends with the hour of completion following an effective recalibration. Whenever the failed calibration, corrective action, and effective recalibration occur within the same hour, the hour is not out-of-control if 2 or more valid readings are obtained during that hour as required by Chapter 2, Subdivision B, Paragraph 5.

        An out-of-control period also occurs whenever interference of a flow monitor is identified. The out-of-control period begins with the hour of the failed interference check and ends with the hour of completion of an interference check that is passed.

        f. Data Recording

        Record and tabulate all calibration error test data according to the month, day, clock-hour, and magnitude in ppm, DSCFH, and percent volume. Program monitors that automatically adjust data to the calibrated corrected calibration values (for example, microprocessor control) to record either: (1) the unadjusted concentration or flow rate measured in the calibration error test prior to resetting the calibration, or (2) the magnitude of any adjustment. Record the following applicable flow monitor interference check data: (1) sample line/sensing port pluggage, and (2) malfunction of each RTD, transceiver, or equivalent.

    2. Semi-annual Assessments

      For each CEMS, perform the following assessments once semi-annually thereafter, as specified below for the type of test. These semi-annual assessments shall be completed within six months of the end of the calendar quarter in which the CEMS was last tested for certification purposes (initial and recertification) or within three months of the end of the calendar quarter in which the District sent notice of a provisional approval for a CEMS, whichever is later. Thereafter, the semi-annual tests shall be completed within six months of the end of the calendar quarter in which the CEMS was last tested. For CEMS on bypass stacks/ducts, the assessments shall be performed once every two successive operating quarters in which the bypass stacks/ducts were operated. These tests shall be performed after the calendar quarter in which the CEMS was last tested as part of the CEMS certification, as specified below for the type of test.

      Relative accuracy tests may be performed on an annual basis rather than on a semi-annual basis if the relative accuracies during the previous audit for the NOx pollutant concentration monitor, flow monitoring system, and NOx emission rate measurement system is 7.5 percent or less.

      For CEMS on any stack or duct through which no emissions have passed in two or more successive quarters, the semi-annual assessments must be performed within 14 operating days after emissions pass through the stack/duct.

        a. Relative Accuracy Test Audit

        Perform relative accuracy test audits and bias tests semi-annually and no less than 4 months apart for each NOx pollutant concentration monitor, stack gas volumetric flow rate measurement systems, and the NOx mass emission rate measurement system in accordance with Chapter 2, Subdivision B, Paragraph 10, Chapter 2, Subdivision B, Paragraph 11, and Chapter 2, Subdivision B, Paragraph 12. The relative accuracy of the pollutant concentration monitor and the mass emission rate measurement system shall be less than or equal to 20.0 percent, and the relative accuracy of the stack gas volumetric flow rate measurement system shall be less than or equal to 15.0 percent. For monitors on bypass stacks/ducts, perform relative accuracy test audits once every two successive bypass operating quarters in accordance with Paragraphs 2.B.10, 2.B.11, and 2.B.12.

        b. Out-of-Control Period- Relative Accuracy Test Audit

        An out-of-control period occurs under any of the following conditions: (1) The relative accuracy of an NOx pollutant concentration monitor or the NOx emission rate measurement system exceeds 20.0 percent; or (2) the relative accuracy of the flow rate monitor exceeds 15.0 percent. The out-of-control period begins with the hour of completion of the failed relative accuracy test audit and ends with the hour of completion of a satisfactory relative accuracy test audit.

        c. Out-of-Control Period - BIAS Test

        An out-of-control period occurs if all the following conditions are met:

        i. Failure of a bias test as specified in Attachment B of this Appendix;

        ii. The CEMS is biased low relative to the reference method (i.e. Bias Adjustment Factor (BAF), as determined in Attachment B of this Appendix, is greater than 1); and

        iii. The Facility Permit holder does not apply the BAF to the CEMS data.

        The out-of-control period begins with the hour of completion of the failed bias test audit and ends with the hour of completion of a satisfactory bias test.

    3. Calibration of Transducers and Transmitters on Stack Flow Monitors

      All transducers and transmitters installed on stack flow monitors must be calibrated every two operating calendar quarters, in which an operating calendar quarter is any calendar quarter during which at anytime emissions flow through the stack. Calibration must be done in accordance with Executive Officer approved calibration procedures that employ materials and equipment that are NIST traceable.

      When a calibration produces for a transducer and transmitter a percentage accuracy of greater than ± 1%, the Facility Permit holder shall calibrate the transducer and transmitter every calendar operating quarter until a subsequent calibration which shows a percentage accuracy of less than ± 1% is achieved. An out-of-control period occurs when the percentage accuracy exceeds ±2%. If an out-of-control period occurs, the Facility Permit holder shall take corrective measures to obtain a percentage accuracy of less than ±2% prior to performing the next RATA. The out-of-control period begins with the hour of completion of the failed calibration error test and ends with the hour of completion of following an effective recalibration. Whenever the failed calibration, corrective action, and effective recalibration occur within the same hour, the hour is not out-of-control if two or more valid data readings are obtained during that hour as required by Chapter 2, Subdivision B, Paragraph 5, Subparagraph a.