SCAQMD RULE 2012-ATTACHMENTS A-G
LAST REVISED 11/11/11

RULE 2012 ATTACHMENTS


ATTACHMENT A - 1N PROCEDURE

ATTACHMENT B - BIAS TEST

ATTACHMENT C - QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES

ATTACHMENT D - EQUIPMENT TUNING PROCEDURES

ATTACHMENT E - LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

ATTACHMENT F - DEFINITIONS

ATTACHMENT G - SUPPLEMENTAL AND ALTERNATIVE CEMS PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR LOW NOX CONCENTRATIONS



TABLE OF CONTENTS

ATTACHMENT A - 1N PROCEDURE

A. Applicability ....................................... A-1
B. Procedure .......................................... A-1



ATTACHMENT A

1 N PROCEDURE

A. APPLICABILITY

  1. This procedure may be used to provide substitute data for affected sources that meet the specified conditions in Chapter 2, Subdivision E, Paragraph 1, Subparagraph b, Clause i, Chapter 2, Subdivision E, Paragraph 2, Subparagraph b, Clause i, and Chapter 3, Subdivision I, Paragraph 2, Subparagraph a.

B. PROCEDURE

  1. Where N is the number of hours of missing emissions data, determine the substitute hourly NOX concentration (in ppmv), or the hourly flow rate (in scfh) by averaging the measured or substituted values for the 1N hours immediately before the missing data period and the 1N hours immediately after the missing data period.
  2. Where 1N hours before or after the missing data period includes a missing data hour, the substituted value previously recorded for such hour(s) pursuant to the missing data procedure shall be used to determine the average in accordance with Subdivision B, Paragraph 1 above.
  3. Substitute the calculated average value for each hour of the N hours of missing data.

EXAMPLES OF 1 N PROCEDURE

EXAMPLE 1

HOUR DATA POINT (LB/HR)
1:00 A.M. 30
2:00 A.M. 25
3:00 A.M. 32
4:00 A.M. 34
5:00 A.M. Missing
6:00 A.M. Missing
7:00 A.M. Missing
8:00 A.M. 27
9:00 A.M. 22
10:00 A.M. 25
11:00 A.M. 30
1:00 A.M. 30
2:00 A.M. 25
3:00 A.M. 32
4:00 A.M. 34
5:00 A.M. 27.5
6:00 A.M. 27.5
7:00 A.M. 27.5
8:00 A.M. 27
9:00 A.M. 22
10:00 A.M. 25
11:00 A.M. 30


To fill in the missing three hours, take the data points from the 3 hours before and the 3 hours after the missing data period to determine an average emission over the 3 hours

                      25 + 32 + 34 + 27 + 22 + 25
average emissions =  -----------------------------  =  27.5 lb/hr.
                                  6

EXAMPLES OF 1 N PROCEDURE

EXAMPLE 2

HOUR DATA POINT (LB/HR)
1:00 A.M. 45
2:00 A.M. 50
3:00 A.M. 53
4:00 A.M. Missing
5:00 A.M. Missing
6:00 A.M. Missing
7:00 A.M. 58
8:00 A.M. Missing
9:00 A.M. 48
10:00 A.M. 45
1:00 A.M. 45
2:00 A.M. 50
3:00 A.M. 53
4:00 A.M. Missing
5:00 A.M. Missing
6:00 A.M. Missing
7:00 A.M. 58
8:00 A.M. 53
9:00 A.M. 48
10:00 A.M. 45


In this example the missing data point at 8 A.M. is in the 3-hour period after the 3- hour missing data period. We first fill the 8.A.M. slot.

                                 58 + 48
average emissions for 8 A.M.  = ---------  =  53
                                    2

The filled in data sheet at this point should read as follows:

The average for the three hour missing data period is:

 
                       45 + 50 + 53 + 58 + 53 + 48
average emissions  =  -----------------------------  =  51.2
                                    6


ATTACHMENT B BIAS TEST

BIAS TEST

The bias of the data shall be determined based on the relative accuracy (RA) test data sets and the relative accuracy (RATA) test audit data sets for NOX pollutant concentration monitors, fuel gas sulfur content monitors, flow monitors, and emission rate measurement systems using the procedures outlined below.

  1. Calculate the mean of the difference using Equation 2-1 of 40 CFR, Part 60, Appendix B, Performance Specification 2. To calculate bias for a NOX pollutant concentration monitor, "d" shall, for each paired data point, be the difference between the NOXconcentration values (in ppmv) obtained from the reference method and the monitor. To calculate bias for a flow monitor, "d" shall, for each paired data point, be the difference between the flow rate values (in dscfh) obtained from the reference method and the monitor. To calculate bias for an emission rate measurement system, "d" shall, for each paired data point, be the difference between the emission rate values (in lb/hr) obtained from the reference method and the monitoring system.
  2. Calculate the standard deviation, Sd, of the data set using Equation 2-2 of 40 CFR, Part 60, Appendix B, Performance Specification 2.
  3. Calculate the confidence coefficient, cc, of the data set using Equation 2-3 of 40 CFR, Part 60, Appendix B, Performance Specification 2.
  4. The monitor passes the bias test if it meets either of the following criteria:


    1. a. the absolute value of the mean difference is less than |cc|.
    2. b. the absolute value of the mean difference is less than 1 ppmv.
  5. Alternatively, if the monitoring device fails to meet the bias test requirement, the Facility Permit holder may choose to use the bias adjustment procedure as follows:


    1. a. If the CEMS is biased high reltive to the reference method, no correction will be applied.
    2. b. If the CEMS is biased low relative to the reference method, the data shall be corrected for bias using the following procedure:
    3. CEMiadjusted = CEMimonitored x BAF(Eq. B-1)
    4. where:
      1. CEMiadjusted = Data value adjusted for bias at time i.
      2. CEMimonitored = Data provided by the CEMS at time i.
      3. BAF = Bias Adjustment Factor
      4. BAF = 1 + (|d|/CEM) (Eq. B-2)
      5. where:
      6. d = Arithmetic mean of the difference between the CEMS and the reference method measurements during the determination of the bias.
      7. CEM = Mean of the data values provided by the CEMS during the determination of bias.
      8. If the bias test failed in a multi-level RA or RATA, calculate the BAF for each operating level. Apply the largest BAF obtained to correct for the CEM data output using equation B-1. Apply this adjustment to all monitoring data and emission rates from the time and date of the failed bias test until the date and time of a RATA that does not show bias. These adjusted values shall be used in all forms of missing data computation, and in calculating the mass emission rate.
      9. The BAF is unique for each CEMS. If backup CEMS is used, any BAF applied to primary CEMS shall be applied to the backup CEMS unless there are RATA data for the backup CEMS within the previous year.



      1. TABLE OF CONTENTS


      2. ATTACHMENT C - QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES
A. Quality Control Program ....................................... C-1
B. Frequency of Testing ............................................. C-2






      1. ATTACHMENT C
      2. QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES
      3. A.QUALITY CONTROL PROGRAM
      4. Develop and implement a quality control program for the continuous emission monitoring systems and their components. As a minimum, include in each quality control program a written plan that describes in detail complete, step-by-step procedures and operations for each of the following activities:
  1. Calibration Error Test Procedures

Identify calibration error test procedures specific to the CEMS that may require variance from the procedures used during certification (for example, how the gases are to be injected, adjustments of flow rates and pressures, introduction of reference values, length of time for injection of calibration gases, steps for obtaining calibration error, determination of interferences, and when calibration adjustments should be made).

  1. Calibration and Linearity Adjustments

Explain how each component of the CEMS will be adjusted to provide correct responses to calibration gases, reference values, and/or indications of interference both initially and after repairs or corrective action. Identify equations, conversion factors, assumed moisture content, and other factors affecting calibration of each CEMS.

  1. Preventative Maintenance

Keep a written record of procedures, necessary to maintain the CEMS in proper operating condition and a schedule for those procedures.

  1. Audit Procedures

Keep copies of written reports received from testing firms/laboratories of procedures and details specific to the installed CEMS that were to be used by the testing firms/laboratories for relative accuracy test audits, such as sampling and analysis methods. The testing firms/laboratories shall have received approval from the District by going through the District's laboratory approval program.

  1. Record Keeping Procedures

Keep a written record describing procedures that will be used to implement the record keeping and reporting requirements.

Specific provisions of Section A-3 and A-5 above of the quality control programs shall constitute specific guidelines for facility personnel. However facilities shall be required to take reasonable steps to monitor and assure implementation of such specific guidelines. Such reasonable steps may include periodic audits, issuance of periodic reminders, implementing training classes, discipline of employees as necessary, and other appropriate measures. Steps that a facility commits to take to monitor and assure implementation of the specific guidelines shall be set forth in the written plan and shall be the only elements of Section A-3 and A-5 that constitute enforceable requirements under the written plan, unless other program provisions are independently enforceable pursuant to other requirements of the NOXprotocols or District or federal rules or regulations.

B. FREQUENCY OF TESTING

The frequency at which each quality assurance test must be performed is as follows:

  1. Periodic Assessments

For each monitor or CEMS, perform the following assessments on each day during which the unit combusts any fuel or processes any material (hereafter referred to as a "unit operating day"), or for a monitor or a CEMS on a bypass stack/duct, on each day during which emissions pass through the bypass stack or duct. These requirements are effective as of the date when the monitor or CEMS completes certification testing.

    1. a. Calibration Error Testing Requirements for Pollutant Concentration Monitors and O2 Monitors
    2. Test, record, and compute the calibration error of each NOXpollutant concentration monitor and O2 monitor at least once on each unit operating day, or for monitors or monitoring systems on bypass stacks/ducts on each day that emissions pass through the bypass stack or duct. Conduct calibration error checks, to the extent practicable, approximately 24 hours apart. Perform the daily calibration error test according to the procedure in Paragraph B.1.a.ii. of this Attachment.
    3. For units with more than one span range, perform the daily calibration error test on each scale that has been used since the last calibration error test. For example, if the emissions concentration has not exceeded the low-scale span range since the previous calendar day, the calibration error test may be performed on the low-scale only. If, however, the emissions concentration has exceeded the low-scale span range since the previous calibration error test, perform the calibration error test on both the low- and high-scales
      1. i. Design Requirements for Calibration Error Testing of NOXConcentration Monitors and O2 Monitors
      2. Design and equip each NOX concentration monitor and O2 monitor with a calibration gas injection port that allows a check of the entire measurement system when calibration gases are introduced. For extractive and dilution type monitors, all monitoring components exposed to the sample gas, (for example, sample lines, filters, scrubbers, conditioners, and as much of the probe as practical) are included in the measurement system. For in situ type monitors, the calibration must check against the injected gas for the performance of all electronic and optical components (for example, transmitter, receiver, analyzer).
      3. Design and equip each pollutant concentration monitor and O2 monitor to allow daily determinations of calibration error (positive or negative) at the zero-level (0 to 20 percent of each span range) and high-level (80 to 100 percent of each span range) concentrations.
      4. ii. Calibration Error Test for NOX Concentration Monitors and O2 Monitors
      5. Measure the calibration error of each NOX concentration analyzer and O2 monitor once each day according to the following procedures:
      6. If any manual or automatic adjustments to the monitor settings are made, conduct the calibration error test in a way that the magnitude of the adjustments can be determined and recorded.
      7. Perform calibration error tests at two concentrations: (1) zero-level and (2) high level. Zero level is 0 to 20 percent of each span range, and high level is 80 to 100 percent of each span range. Use only NIST/EPA-approved certified reference material, standard reference material, or Protocol 1 calibration gases certified by the vendor to be within 2 percent of the label value.
      8. Introduce the calibration gas at the gas injection port as specified above. Operate each monitor in its normal sampling mode. For extractive and dilution type monitors, pass the audit gas through all filters, scrubbers, conditioners, and other monitor components used during normal sampling and through as much of the sampling probe as practical. For in situ type monitors, perform calibration checking all active electronic and optical components, including the transmitter, receiver, and analyzer. Challenge the NOX concentration monitors and the O2 monitors once with each gas. Record the monitor response from the data acquisition and handling system. Use the following equation to determine the calibration error at each concentration once each day:
      | R - A |
CE = -----------  x  100                    (Eq. C-1)
          S

Where:

    1. CE = Percentage calibration error based on the span range
    2. R = Reference value of zero- or high-level calibration gas introduced into the monitoring system.
    3. A = Actual monitoring system response to the calibration gas.
    4. S = Span range of the instrument
    5. b. Calibration Error Testing Requirements for Stack Flow Monitors
    6. Test, compute, and record the calibration error of each stack flow monitor at least once within every 14 calendar day period during which at anytime emissions flow through the stack; or for monitors or monitoring systems on bypass stacks or ducts, at least once within every 14 calendar day period during which at anytime emissions flow through the bypass stack or duct. Introduce a zero reference value to the transducer or transmitter. Record flow monitor output from the data acquisition and handling systems before and after any adjustments. Calculate the calibration error using the following equation :
      | R - A |
CE = -----------  x  100                    (Eq. C-2)
          S

Where:

    1. CE = Percentage calibration error based on the span range
    2. R = Zero reference value introduced into the transducer or transmitter.
    3. A = Actual monitoring system response.
    4. S = Span range of the flow monitor.
    5. c. Interference Check for Stack Flow Monitors
    6. Perform the daily flow monitor interference checks specified in Paragraph B.1.c.i. of this Attachment at least once per operating day (when the unit(s) operate for any part of the day).
    7. i. Design Requirements for Flow Monitor Interference Checks
    8. Design and equip each flow monitor with a means to ensure that the moisture expected to occur at the monitoring location does not interfere with the proper functioning of the flow monitoring system. Design and equip each flow monitor with a means to detect, on at least a daily basis, pluggage of each sample line and sensing port, and malfunction of each resistance temperature detector (RTD), transceiver, or equivalent.
    9. Design and equip each differential pressure flow monitor to provide (1) an automatic, periodic backpurging (simultaneously on both sides of the probe) or equivalent method of sufficient force and frequency to keep the probe and lines sufficiently free of obstructions on at least a daily basis to prevent sensing interference, and (2) a means to detecting leaks in the system at least on a quarterly basis (a manual check is acceptable).
    10. Design and equip each thermal flow monitor with a means to ensure on at least a daily basis that the probe remains sufficiently clean to prevent velocity sensing interference.
    11. Design and equip each ultrasonic flow monitor with a means to ensure on at least a daily basis that the transceivers remain sufficiently clean (for example, backpurging the system) to prevent velocity sensing interference.
    12. d. Recalibration
    13. Adjust the calibration, at a minimum, whenever the calibration error exceeds the limits of the applicable performance specification for the NOX monitor, O2 monitor or stack flow monitor to meet such specifications. Repeat the calibration error test procedure following the adjustment or repair to demonstrate that the corrective actions were effective. Document the adjustments made.
    14. e. Out-of-Control Period
    15. An out-of-control period occurs when the calibration error of an NOXconcentration monitor exceeds 5.0 percent based upon the span range value, when the calibration error of an O2 monitor exceeds 1.0 percent O2, or when the calibration error of a flow monitor exceeds 6.0 percent based upon the span range value, which is twice the applicable specification. The out-of-control period begins with the hour of completion of the failed calibration error test and ends with the hour of completion following an effective recalibration. Whenever the failed calibration, corrective action, and effective recalibration occur within the same hour, the hour is not out-of-control if 2 or more valid readings are obtained during that hour as required by Chapter 2, Subdivision B, Paragraph 5.
    16. An out-of-control period also occurs whenever interference of a flow monitor is identified. The out-of-control period begins with the hour of the failed interference check and ends with the hour of completion of an interference check that is passed.
    17. f. Data Recording
    18. Record and tabulate all calibration error test data according to the month, day, clock-hour, and magnitude in ppm, DSCFH, and percent volume. Program monitors that automatically adjust data to the calibrated corrected calibration values (for example, microprocessor control) to record either: (1) the unadjusted concentration or flow rate measured in the calibration error test prior to resetting the calibration, or (2) the magnitude of any adjustment. Record the following applicable flow monitor interference check data: (1) sample line/sensing port pluggage, and (2) malfunction of each RTD, transceiver, or equivalent.
  1. Semi-annual Assessments

For each CEMS, perform the following assessments once semi-annually thereafter, as specified below for the type of test. These semi-annual assessments shall be completed within six months of the end of the calendar quarter in which the CEMS was last tested for certification purposes (initial and recertification) or within three months of the end of the calendar quarter in which the District sent notice of a provisional approval for a CEMS, whichever is later. Thereafter, the semi-annual tests shall be completed within six months of the end of the calendar quarter in which the CEMS was last tested. For CEMS on bypass stacks/ducts, the assessments shall be performed once every two successive operating quarters in which the bypass stacks/ducts were operated. These tests shall be performed after the calendar quarter in which the CEMS was last tested as part of the CEMS certification, as specified below for the type of test.

Relative accuracy tests may be performed on an annual basis rather than on a semi-annual basis if the relative accuracies during the previous audit for the NOX CEMS are 7.5 percent or less.

For CEMS on any stack or duct through which no emissions have passed in two or more successive quarters, the semi-annual assessments must be performed within 14 operating days after emissions pass through the stack/duct.

a. Relative Accuracy Test Audit

Perform relative accuracy test audits and bias tests semi-annually and no less than 4 months apart for each NOX pollutant concentration monitor, stack gas volumetric flow measurement systems, and the NOXemission rate measurement system in accordance with Chapter 2, Subdivision B, Paragraph 10, Chapter 2, Subdivision B, Paragraph 11, and Chapter 2, Subdivision B, Paragraph 12. For monitors on bypass stacks/ducts, perform relative accuracy test audits once every two successive bypass operating quarters in accordance with Paragraphs 2.B.10, 2.B.11, and 2.B.12.

b. Out-of-Control Period

An out-of-control period occurs under any of the following conditions: (1) The relative accuracy of an NOX pollutant concentration monitor or the NOX emission rate measurement system exceeds 20.0 percent; or (2) the relative accuracy of the flow rate monitor exceeds 15.0 percent. The out-of-control period begins with the hour of completion of the failed relative accuracy test audit and ends with the hour of completion of a satisfactory relative accuracy test audit.

Failure of the bias test results in the system or monitor being out-of-control. The out-of-control period begins with the hour of completion of the failed bias test audit and ends with the hour of completion of a satisfactory bias test.

  1. Calibration of Transducers and Transmitters on Stack Flow Monitors

All transducers and transmitters installed on stack flow monitors must be calibrated every two operating calendar quarters, in which an operating calendar quarter is any calendar quarter during which at anytime emissions flow through the stack. Calibration must be done in accordance with Executive Officer approved calibration procedures that employ materials and equipment that are NIST traceable.

When a calibration produces for a transducer and transmitter a percentage accuracy of greater than 1%, the Facility Permit holder shall calibrate the transducer and transmitter every calendar operating quarter until a subsequent calibration which shows a percentage accuracy of less than 1% is achieved. An out-of-control period occurs when the percentage accuracy exceeds 2%. If an out-of-control period occurs, the Facility Permit holder shall take corrective measures to obtain a percentage accuracy of less than 2% prior to performing the next RATA. The out-of-control period begins with the hour of completion of the failed calibration error test and ends with the hour of completion of following an effective recalibration. Whenever the failed calibration, corrective action, and effective recalibration occur within the same hour, the hour is not out-of-control if two or more valid data readings are obtained during that hour as required by Chapter 2, Subdivision B, Paragraph 5, Subparagraph a.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

ATTACHMENT D - EQUIPMENT TUNING PROCEDURES

A. Procedures............................................. D-1


EQUIPMENT TUNING PROCEDURES

A. PROCEDURES

Nothing in this Equipment Tuning Procedure shall be construed to require any act or omission that would result in unsafe conditions or would be in violation of any regulation or requirement established by Factory Mutual, Industrial Risk Insurers, National Fire Prevention Association, the California Department of Industrial Relations (Occupational Safety and Health Division), the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or other relevant regulations and requirements.

  1. Operate the unit at the firing rate most typical of normal operation. If the unit experiences significant load variations during normal operation, operate it at its average firing rate.
  2. At this firing rate, record stack-gas temperature, oxygen concentration, and CO concentration (for gaseous fuels) or smoke-spot number 2 (for liquid fuels), and observe flame conditions after unit operation stabilizes at the firing rate selected. If the excess oxygen in the stack gas is at the lower end of the range of typical minimum values, and if CO emissions are low and there is no smoke, the unit is probably operating at near optimum efficiency at this particular firing rate.
  3. Increase combustion air flow to the furnace until stack-gas oxygen levels increase by one to two percent over the level measured in Step 2. As in Step 2, record the stack-gas temperature, CO concentration (for gaseous fuels) or smoke-spot number (for liquid fuels), and observe flame conditions for these higher oxygen levels after boiler operation stabilizes.
  4. Decrease combustion air flow until the stack gas oxygen concentration is at the level measure in Step 2. From this level, gradually reduce the combustion air flow in small increments. After each increments, record the stack-gas temperature, oxygen concentration, CO concentration (for gaseous fuels), and smoke-spot number (for liquid fuels). Also observe the flame and record any changes in its condition.
  5. Continue to reduce combustion air flow stepwise, until one of these limits is reached:


    1. a. Unacceptable flame conditions, such as flame impingement on furnace walls or burner parts, excessive flame carryover, or flame instability; or
    2. b. Stack gas CO concentrations greater than 400 ppm; or
    3. c. Smoking at the stack; or
    4. d. Equipment-related limitations, such as low windbox/furnace pressure differential, built in air-flow limits, etc.
  6. Develop an O2/CO curve (for gaseous fuels) or O2/smoke curve (for liquid fuels) using the excess oxygen and CO or smoke-spot number data obtained at each combustion air flow setting.
  7. From the curves prepared in Step 6, find the stack-gas oxygen levels where the CO emissions or smoke-spot number equal the following values:
Fuel Measurement Value
Gaseous CO emissions 400 ppm
#1 and #2 oils smoke-spot number number 1
#4 oil smoke-spot number number 2
#5 oil smoke-spot number number 3
Other oils smoke-spot number number 4


The above conditions are referred to as the CO or smoke thresholds, or as the minimum excess oxygen level.

Compare this minimum value of excess oxygen to the expected value provided by the combustion unit manufacturer. If the minimum level found is substantially higher than the value provided by the combustion unit manufacturer, burner adjustments can probably be made to improve fuel and air mixing, thereby allowing operation with less air.

  1. Add 0.5 to 2.0 percent of the minimum excess oxygen level found in Step 7 and reset burner controls to operate automatically at this higher stack-gas oxygen level. This margin above the minimum oxygen level accounts for fuel variations, variations in atmospheric conditions, load changes, and nonrepeatability or play in automatic controls.
  2. If the load of the combustion unit varies significantly during normal operation, repeat Steps 1-8 for firing rates that represent the upper and lower limits of the range of the load. Because control adjustments at one firing rate may affect conditions at other firing rates, it may not be possible to establish the optimum excess oxygen level at all firing rates. If this is the case, choose the burner control settings that give best performance over the range of firing rates. If one firing rate predominates, settings should optimize conditions at that rate.
  3. Verify that the new settings can accommodate the sudden load changes that may occur in daily operation without adverse effects. Do this by increasing and decreasing load rapidly while observing the flame and stack. If any of the conditions in Step 5 result, reset the combustion controls to provide a slightly higher level of excess oxygen at the affected firing rates. Next, verify these new recorded at steady-rate operating conditions for future reference.


ATTACHMENT E - LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

APEP Annual Permit Emission Program
API American Petroleum Institute
ASTM American Society for Testing & Materials
BACT Best Available Control Technology
bhp Brake Horsepower
bpd Barrels per Day
Btu British Thermal Unit
CEMS Continuous Emission Monitoring System
CPMS Continuous Process Monitoring System
CPU Central Processing Unit
CSCACS Central Station Compliance Advisory Computer System
DAS Data Acquisition System
DM District Method
dscfh Dry Standard Cubic Feet per Hour
FCCU Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit
Fd Dry F Factor
FGR Flue Gas Recirculation
gpm Gallons per Minute
HRG Hardware Requirement Guideline
ICE Internal Combustion Engine
ID Inside Diameter
ISO International Standards Organization
lbmole Pound mole
LNB Low NOX Burner
MRR Monitoring, Reporting and Recordkeeping
NIST National Institute of Standards for Testing
NOX Oxides of Nitrogen
NSCR Non-Selective Catalytic Reduction
O2 Oxygen
ppmv Parts per Million Volume
ppmw Parts per Million by Weight
RAA Relative Accuracy Audit
RATA Relative Accuracy Test Audit
RECLAIM Regional Clean Air Incentives Market
RM Reference Method
RTC RECLAIM Trading Credits
RTCC Real Time Calendar/Clock
RTU Remote Terminal Unit
scfh Standard Cubic Feet per Hour
scfm Standard Cubic Feet per Minute
SCR Selective Catalytic Reduction
SDD Software Design Description
SNCR Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction
SOX Oxides of Sulfur
SRG Software/Hardware Requirement Guideline
swi Steam Water Injection
tpd Tons per day
tpy Tons per year
WAN Wide Area Network



ATTACHMENT F - DEFINITIONS

DEFINITIONS

  1. AFTERBURNERS, also called VAPOR INCINERATORS, are air pollution control devices in which combustion converts the combustible materials in gaseous effluents to carbon dioxide and water.
  2. ANNUAL PERMIT EMISSIONS PROGRAM (APEP) is the annual facility permit compliance reporting, review, and fee reporting program.
  3. BOILER should generally be considered as any combustion equipment used to produce steam, including a carbon moNOXide boiler. This would generally not include a process heater that transfers heat from combustion gases to process streams, a waste heat recovery boiler that is used to recover sensible heat from the exhaust of process equipment such as a combustion turbine, or a recovery furnace that is used to recover process chemicals. Boilers used primarily for residential space and/or water heating are not affected by this section.
  4. BREAKDOWN means a condition caused by circumstances beyond the operator's control which result in a fire or mechanical or electrical failure causing an emission increase in excess of emissions under normal operating conditions. Malfunctions of monitoring, recordkeeping and reporting equipment shall not be considered a breakdown.
  5. BURN means to combust any gaseous fuel, whether for useful heat or by incineration without recovery, except for flaring or emergency vent gases.
  6. BYPASS OPERATING QUARTER means each calendar quarter that emissions pass through the bypass stack or duct.
  7. CALCINER is a rotary kiln where calcination reaction is carried out between 1315 oC to 1480 oC.
  8. CEMENT KILN is a device for the calcining and clinkering of limestone, clay and other raw materials, and recycle dust in the dry-process manufacture of cement.
  9. CONCENTRATION LIMIT is a value expressed in ppmv, is measured over any continuous 60 minutes, is elected by the Facility Permit holder for a large NOX source, and is specified in the Facility Permit.
  10. CONTINUOUS EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEM (CEMS) is the total equipment required for the determination of concentrations of air contaminants and diluent gases in a source effluent as well as mass emission rate. The system consists of the following three major subsystems:


    1. (A) SAMPLING INTERFACE is that portion of the monitoring system that performs one or more of the following operations: extraction, physical/chemical separation, transportation, and conditioning of a sample of the source effluent or protection of the analyzer from the hostile aspects of the sample or source environment.
    2. (B) ANALYZERS
      1. (i) AIR CONTAMINANT ANALYZER is that portion of the monitoring system that senses the air contaminant and generates a signal output which is a function of the concentration of that contaminant.
      2. (ii) DILUENT ANALYZER is that portion of the monitoring system that senses the concentration of oxygen or carbon dioxide or other diluent gas as applicable, and generates a signal output which is a function of a concentration of that diluent gas.
      3. (C) DATA RECORDER is that portion of the monitoring system that provides a permanent record of the output signals in terms of concentration units, and includes additional equipment such as a computer required to convert the original recorded value to any value required for reporting.
  11. CONTINUOUS PROCESS MONITORING SYSTEM is the total equipment required for the measurement and collection of process variables (e.g., fuel usage rate, oxygen content of stack gas, or process weight). Such CPMS data shall be used in conjunction with the appropriate emission rate to determine NOX emissions.
  12. CONTINUOUSLY MEASURE means to measure at least once every 15 minutes except during period of routine maintenance and calibration, as specified in 40CFR Part 60.13(e)(2).
  13. DAILY means a calendar day starting at 12 midnight and continuing through to the following 12 midnight hour.
  14. DIRECT MONITORING DEVICE is a device that directly measures the variables specified by the Executive Officer to be necessary to determine mass emissions of a RECLAIM pollutant and which meets all the standards of performance for CEMS set forth in the protocols for NOX and SOX.
  15. DRYER is an equipment that removes substances by heating or other process.
  16. ELECTRONICALLY TRANSMITTING means transmitting measured data without human alteration between the point/source of measurement and transmission.
  17. EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT is equipment solely used on a standby basis in cases of emergency, defined as emergency equipment on the Facility Permit; or is equipment that does not operate more than 200 hours per year and is not used in conjunction with any voluntary demand reduction program, and is defined as emergency equipment in the Facility Permit.
  18. EMISSION FACTOR is the value specified in Tables 1 (NOX) or 2 (SOX) of Rule 2002-Baselines and Rates of Reduction for NOX and SOX.
  19. EMISSION RATE (ER) - is a value expressed in terms of NOXmass emissions per unit of heat input, and derived using the methodology specified in the "Protocol for Monitoring, Reporting, and Recordkeeping for Oxides of Nitrogen (NOX) Emissions" Chapter .
  20. EXISTING EQUIPMENT is any equipment which can emit NOX at a NOX RECLAIM facility, for which on or before (Rule Adoption date) has:


    1. (A) A valid permit to construct or permit to operate pursuant to Rule 201 and/or Rule 203 has been issued; or
    2. (B) An application for a permit to construct or permit to operate has been deemed complete by the Executive Officer; or
    3. (C) An equipment which is exempt from permit per Rule 219 and is operating on or before (Rule Adoption date).
  21. Fd FACTOR is the dry F factor for each fuel, the ratio of the dry gas volume of the products of combustion to the heat content of the fuel (dscf/106 Btu). F factors are available in 40 CFR Part 60, Appendix A, Method 19.
  22. FLUID CATALYTIC CRACKING UNIT (FCCU) breaks down heavy petroleum products into lighter products using heat in the presence of finely divided catalyst maintained in a fluidized state by the oil vapors. The fluid catalyst is continuously circulated between the reactor and the regenerator, using air, oil vapor, and steam as the conveying media.
  23. FURNACE is an enclosure in which energy in a nonthermal form is converted to heat.
  24. GAS FLARE is a combustion equipment used to prevent unsafe operating pressures in process units during shut downs and start-ups and to handle miscellaneous hydrocarbon leaks and process upsets.
  25. GAS TURBINES are turbines that use gas as the working fluid. It is principally used to propel jet aircraft. Their stationary uses include electric power generation (usually for peak-load demands), end-of-line voltage booster service for long distance transmission lines, and for pumping natural gas through long distance pipelines. Gas turbines are used in combined (cogeneration) and simple-cycle arrangements.
  26. GASEOUS FUELS include, but are not limited to, any natural, process, synthetic, landfill, sewage digester, or waste gases with a gross heating value of 300 Btu per cubic foot or higher, at standard conditions.
  27. HEAT VALUE is the heat generated when one lb. of combustible is completely burned.
  28. HEATER is any combustion equipment fired with liquid and/or gaseous fuel and which transfers heat from combustion gases to water or process streams.
  29. HIGH HEAT VALUE is determined experimentally by colorimeters in which the products of combustion are cooled to the initial temperature and the heat absorbed by the cooling media is measured.
  30. HOT STAND-BY is the period of operation when the flow or emission concentration are so low they can not be measured in a representative manner.
  31. INCINERATOR is an equipment that consume substances by burning.
  32. INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE is any spark or compression-ignited internal combustion engine, not including engines used for self-propulsion.
  33. LIQUID FUELS include, but are not limited to, any petroleum distillates or fuels in liquid form derived from fossil materials or agricultural products for the purpose of creating useful heat.
  34. MASS EMISSION OF NOX in lbs/hr is the measured emission rates of nitrogen oxides.
  35. MAXIMUM RATED CAPACITY means maximum design heat input in Btu per hour at the higher heating value of the fuels.
  36. MODEM converts digital signals into audio tones to be transmitted over telephone lines and also convert audio tones from the lines to digital signals for machine use.
  37. MONTHLY FUEL USE REPORTS could be sufficed by the monthly gas bill or the difference between the end and the beginning of the calendar month's fuel meter readings.
  38. NINETIETH (90TH) PERCENTILE means a value that would divide an ordered set of increasing values so that at least 90 percent are less than or equal to the value and at least 10 percent are greater than or equal to the value.
  39. OVEN is a chamber or enclosed compartment equipped to heat objects.
  40. PEAKING UNIT means a turbine used intermittently to produce energy on a demand basis and does not operate more than 1300 hours per year.
  41. PORTABLE EQUIPMENT is an equipment which is not attached to a foundation and is not operated at a single facility for more than 90 days in a year and is not a replacement equipment for a specific application which lasts or is intended to last for more than one year.
  42. PROCESS HEATER means any combustion equipment fired with liquid and/or gaseous fuel and which transfers heat from combustion gases to process streams.
  43. PROCESS WEIGHT means the total weight of all materials introduced into any specific process which may discharge contaminants into the atmosphere. Solid fuels charged shall be considered as part of the process weight, but liquid gaseous fuels and air shall not.
  44. RATED BRAKE HORSEPOWER (bhp) is the maximum rating specified by the manufacturer and listed on the nameplate of that equipment. If not available, then the rated brake horsepower of an internal combustion engine can be calculated by multiplying the maximum fuel usage per unit time, heating value of fuel, equipment efficiency provided by the manufacturer, and the conversion factor (one brake horsepower = 2,545 Btu).
  45. RATED HEAT INPUT CAPACITY is the heat input capacity specified on the nameplate of the combustion unit. If the combustion unit has been altered or modified such that its maximum heat input is different than the heat input capacity specified on the nameplate, the new maximum heat input shall be considered as the rated heat input capacity.
  46. RECLAIM FACILITY is a facility that has been listed as a participant in the Regional Clean Air Incentives Market (RECLAIM) program.
  47. REMOTE TERMINAL UNIT (RTU) is a data collection and transmitting device used to transmit data and calculated results to the District Central Station Computer.
  48. RENTAL EQUIPMENT is equipment which is rented or leased for operation by someone other than the owner of the equipment.
  49. SHUTDOWN is that period of time during which the equipment is allowed to cool from a normal operating temperature range to a cold or ambient temperature.
  50. SOLID FUELS include, but are not limited to, any solid organic material used as fuel for the purpose of creating useful heat.
  51. STANDARD GAS CONDITIONS are defined as a temperature of 68 oF and one atmosphere of pressure.
  52. START-UP is that period of time during which the equipment is heated to operating temperature from a cold or ambient temperature.
  53. SULFURIC ACID PRODUCTION UNIT means any facility producing sulfuric acid by the contact process by burning elemental sulfur, alkylation acid, hydrogen sulfide, organic sulfides and mercaptans or acid sludge, but does not include facilities where conversion to sulfuric acid as utilized primarily as a means of preventing emissions to the atmosphere of sulfur dioxide or other sulfur compounds.
  54. TAIL GAS UNIT is a SOX control equipment associated with refinery sulfur recovery plant.
  55. TEST CELLS are devices used to test the performance of engines such as internal combustion engine and jet engines.
  56. TIMESHARING OF MONITOR means the use of a common monitor for several sources of emissions.
  57. TURBINES are machines that convert energy stored in a fluid into mechanical energy by channeling the fluid through a system of stationary and moving vanes.
  58. UNIT OPERATING DAY means each calendar day that emissions pass through the stack or duct.
  59. UNIVERSE OF SOURCES FOR NOX is a list of RECLAIM facilities that emit NOX.
  60. UNIVERSE OF SOURCES FOR SOX is a list of RECLAIM facilities that emit SOX.
  61. AP 42 is a publication published by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) which is a compilation of air pollution emission rates used to determine mass emission.
  62. ASTM METHOD D1945-81 Method for Analysis of natural gas by gas chromatography.
  63. ASTM METHOD 2622-82 Test Method for sulfur in petroleum products (Xray Spectrographic method)
  64. ASTM METHOD 3588-91 method for calculating colorific value and specific gravity (relative density) of gaseous fuels.
  65. ASTM METHOD 4294-90 test method for sulfur in petroleum products by non-dispersive Xray fluorescence spectrometry.
  66. ASTM METHOD 4891-84 test method for heating value of gases in natural gas range by stoichiometric combustion.
  67. DISTRICT METHOD 2.1 measures gas flow rate through stacks greater than 12 inch in diameter.
  68. DISTRICT METHOD 7.1 colorimetric determination of nitrogen oxides except nitrous oxide emissions from stationary sources by using the phenoldisulfonic acid (pds) procedure or ion chromatograph procedures. Its range is 2 to 400 milligrams NOX (as NO2 per DSCM).
  69. DISTRICT METHOD 100.1 is an instrumental method for measuring gaseous emissions of nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon moNOXide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen.
  70. DISTRICT METHOD 307-91 laboratory procedure for analyzing total reduced sulfur compounds and SO2.
  71. EPA METHOD 19 is the method of determining sulfur dioxide removal efficiency and particulate, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides emission rates from electric utility steam generators.
  72. EPA METHOD 450/3-78-117 air pollutant emission rate for Military and Civil Aircraft.


ATTACHMENT G

SUPPLEMENTAL AND ALTERNATIVE CEMS PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR LOW NOX CONCENTRATIONS

Low Level Spike Recovery/Bias Factor Determination (LLSR/BFD)
High Level Spike Recovery/Bias Factor Determination (HLSR/BFD)
Low Level RATA/Bias Factor Determination (LLR/BFD)
Low Level Calibration Error (LLCE)
Relative Accuracy Test Audit (RATA)
Relative Accuracy (RA)
Full Scale Span (FSS)
National Institute of Standards Traceability (NIST)

A. Applicability of Supplemental and Alternative Performance Requirements

The Facility Permit holder electing to use (B)(8)(d)(ii), in Chapter 2 of Rule 2012, Appendix A to measure NOX concentrations that fall below 10 percent of the lowest vendor guaranteed full scale span range, shall satisfy the performance requirements as specified in Table G-1 listed below. TABLE G-1
Alternative Performance Requirement(s)

CEMS RECLAIM Certified per SOX Protocol, Appendix A Performance Requirements
Yes or No LLSR/BFD HLSR/BFD LLR/BFD LLCE
Yes X + X
No X X + X


  1. + (plus) denotes an additional performance requirement that shall be conducted if the mandatory performance requirement(s) cannot be met.
  2. If the concentration of the CEMS is such that the specifications for the low level spike recovery/bias factor determination cannot be met, the Facility Permit holder shall conduct a low level RATA/bias factor determination.
  3. The provisions of Table F-1 do not apply to (B)(8)(c) or (B)(8)(d)(i), in Chapter 2.

B. Test Definitions, Performance Specifications and Test Procedures

This section explains in detail how each performance requirement is to be conducted.

Low Level Calibration Error

The low level calibration error test is defined as challenging the CEMS (from probe to monitor) with certified calibration gases (NO in N2) at three levels in the 0-20 percent full scale span range. Since stable or certifiable cylinder gas standards (e.g. Protocol 1 or NIST traceable) may not be available at the concentrations required for this test, gas dilution systems may be used, with District approval, if they are used according to either District or EPA protocols for the verification of gas dilution systems in the field. The CEMS high level calibration gas may be diluted for the purpose of conducting the low level calibration error test.

  1. Performance Specifications

Introduce pollutant concentrations at approximately the 20 percent, 10 percent, and 5 percent of full scale span levels through the normal CEMS calibration system. No low level calibration error shall exceed 2.5 percent of full scale span.

  1. Testing Procedures


    1. a. Perform a standard zero/span check; if zero or span check exceeds 2.5 percent full scale span, adjust monitor and redo zero/span check.
    2. b. After zero/span check allow the CEMS to sample stack gas for at least 15 minutes.
    3. c. Introduce any of the low level calibration error standards through the CEMS calibration system.
    4. d. Read the CEMS response to the calibration gas starting no later than three system response times after introducing the calibration gas; the CEMS response shall be averaged for at least three response times and for no longer than six response times.
    5. e. After the low level calibration error check allow the CEMS to sample stack gas for at least 15 minutes.
    6. f. Repeat steps c through e until all three low level calibration error checks are complete.
    7. g. Conduct post test calibration and zero checks.
    8. Spike Recovery and Bias Factor Determinations
    9. Spiking is defined as introducing know concentrations of the pollutant of interest (gas standard to contain a mixture of NO and NO2is representative of the ratio of NO and NO2 in stack gas) and an appropriate non-reactive, non-condensable and non-soluble tracer gas from a single cylinder (Protocol 1 or NIST traceable to 2 percent analytical accuracy if no Protocol 1 is available) near the probe and upstream of any sample conditioning systems, at a flow rate not to exceed 10 percent of the total sample gas flow rate. The purpose of the 10 percent limitation is to ensure that the gas matrix (water, CO2, particulates, interferences) is essentially the same as the stack gas alone. The tracer gas is monitored in real time and the ratio of the monitored concentration to the certified concentration in the cylinder is the dilution factor. The expected pollutant concentration (dilution factor times the certified pollutant concentration in the cylinder) is compared to the monitored pollutant concentration.
    10. High Level Spike Recovery/Bias Factor Determination
    11. The high level spike recovery/bias factor determination is used when it is technologically not possible to certify the CEMS per the standard RECLAIM requirements. The spiking facility/interface shall be a permanently installed part of the CEMS sample acquisition system and accessible to District staff as well as the Facility Permit holder.
  1. Performance Specifications

The CEMS shall demonstrate a RA </= 20 percent, where the spike value is used in place of the reference method in the normal RA calculation, as described below. The bias factor, if applicable, shall also be determined according to Attachment B.

  1. Testing Procedures


    1. a. Spike the sample to the CEMS with a calibration standard containing the pollutant of interest and CO or other non-soluble, non-reacting alternative tracer gas (alternative tracer gas) at a flow rate not to exceed 10 percent of the CEMS sampling flow rate and of such concentrations as to produce an expected 40-80 percent of full scale span for the pollutant of interest and a quantifiable concentration of CO (or alternative tracer gas) that is at least a factor of 10 higher than expected in the unspiked stack gas. The calibration standards for both pollutant of interest and CO (or alternative tracer gas) must meet RECLAIM requirements specified in Attachment A.
    2. b. Monitor the CO (or alternative tracer gas) using an appropriate continuous (or semi-continuous if necessary) monitor meeting the requirements of Method 100.1 and all data falling within the 10-95 percent full scale span, and preferably within 30-70 percent full scale span.
    3. c. Alternate spiked sample gas and unspiked sample gas for a total of nine runs of spiked sample gas and ten runs of unspiked sample gas. Sampling times should be sufficiently long to mitigate response time and averaging effects.
    4. d. For each run, the average CEMS reading must be between 40 percent full scale span and 80 percent full scale span. If not, adjust spiking as necessary and continue runs; but expected spike must represent at least 50 percent of the total pollutant value read by the CEMS.
    5. e. Calculate the spike recovery for both the pollutant and the CO (or alternative tracer gas) for each run by first averaging the pre- and post-spike values for each run and subtracting that value from the spiked value to yield nine values for recovered spikes.
    6. f. Using the CO (or alternative tracer gas) spike recovery values for each run and the certified CO (or alternative tracer gas) concentration, calculate the dilution ratio for each run. Multiply the certified pollutant concentration by the dilution factor for each run to determine the expected diluted pollutant concentrations. Using the expected diluted concentrations as the "reference method" value calculate the Relative Accuracy as specified in Appendix A. The RA shall be </= 20 percent. Determine the bias factor, if applicable, according to Attachment B.
    7. Low Level Spike Recovery/Bias Factor Determination
    8. The low level spike recovery/bias factor determination is used to determine if a significant bias exists at concentrations near the 10 percent full scale span level. The spiking facility/interface shall be a permanently installed part of the CEMS sample acquisition system and accessible to District staff as well as the Facility Permit holder.
  1. Performance Specifications

There are no pass/fail criteria with respect to the magnitude of the percent relative accuracy. There are performance criteria for the range of concentration on the CEMS and the extent to which the spike must be greater than the background pollutant level.

  1. Testing Procedures


    1. a. Spike the sample to the CEMS with a calibration standard containing the pollutant of interest and CO or other non-soluble, non-reacting alternative tracer gas (alternative tracer gas) at a flow rate not to exceed 10 percent of the CEMS sampling flow rate and of such concentrations as to produce an expected 10-25 percent of full scale span for the pollutant of interest and a quantifiable concentration of CO (or alternative tracer gas) that is at least a factor of 10 higher than expected in the unspiked stack gas. The calibration standards for both pollutant of interest and CO (or alternative tracer gas) must meet RECLAIM requirements specified in Appendix A.
    2. b. Monitor the CO (or alternative tracer gas) using an appropriate continuous (or semi-continuous if necessary) monitor meeting the requirements of Method 100.1 and all data falling within the 10-95 percent full scale span, and preferably within 30-70 percent full scale span.
    3. c. Alternate spiked sample gas and unspiked sample gas for a total of nine runs of spiked sample gas and ten runs of unspiked sample gas. Sampling times should be sufficiently long to mitigate response time and averaging effects.
    4. d. For each run, the average CEMS reading must be below 25 percent full scale span and > 10 percent full scale span. If not, adjust spiking as necessary and continue runs; but expected spike must represent at least 50 percent of the total pollutant value read by the CEMS.
    5. e. Calculate the spike recovery for both the pollutant and the CO (or alternative tracer gas) for each run by first averaging the pre- and post-spike values for each run and subtracting that value from the spiked value to yield nine values for recovered spikes.
    6. f. Using the CO (or alternative tracer gas) spike recovery values for each run and the certified CO (or alternative tracer gas) concentration, .calculate the dilution ratio for each run. Multiply the certified pollutant concentration by the dilution factor for each run to determine the expected diluted pollutant concentrations. Using the expected diluted concentrations as the "reference method" value calculate the Relative Accuracy as specified in Appendix A. If the average difference is less than the confidence coefficient then no low level bias factor is applied. If the average difference is greater than the confidence coefficient and the average expected spike is less than the average CEMS measured spike, then no low level bias factor is applied. If the average difference is greater than the confidence coefficient and the average expected spike is greater than the average CEMS measured spike, then a low level bias factor equal to the absolute value of the average difference is added to data reported at or below the 10 percent of full scale span.
    7. Low Level RATA/Bias Factor Determination using Enhanced Reference Method 6.1
    8. A low level RATA/bias factor determination is designed to determine if there exists a statistically significant bias at low level concentrations. It consists of nine test runs that measure the stack concentration and the CEMS concentration concurrently.


    1. Performance Specifications

There are no pass/fail criteria with respect to the magnitude of the percent relative accuracy. There are performance criteria for the special RATA with respect to the reference method and range of concentration on the CEMS.

    1. Testing Procedures

The reference method for the low level RATA/bias factor determination is Method 100.1

    1. a. Perform a minimum of nine runs of low level RATA for CEMS versus the reference method at actual levels (unspiked).
    2. b. The full scale span range for the reference method shall be such that all data falls with 10 - 95 percent of full scale span range.
    3. c. The reference method shall meet all Method 100.1 performance criteria.
    4. d. Calculate the average difference (d = CEMS - reference method, ppm) and confidence coefficient (cc = statistical calculated, ppm).
    5. e. If d > 0 then the bias = 0 ppm; if d < 0 and |d| > cc then bias = d; if d < 0 and |d| < cc then bias = 0 ppm.
    6. C. Testing Frequency
    7. For each CEMS, perform the aforementioned performance requirements once semiannually thereafter, as specified below for the type of test. These semiannual assessments shall be completed within six months of the end of the calendar quarter in which the CEMS was last tested for certification purposes (initial and recertification) or within three months of the end of the calendar quarter in which the District sent notice of a provisional approval for a CEMS, whichever is later. Thereafter, the semiannual tests shall be completed within six months of the end of the calendar quarter in which the CEMS was last tested. For CEMS on bypass stacks/ducts, the assessments shall be performed once every two successive operating quarters in which the bypass stacks/ducts were operated. These tests shall be performed after the calendar quarter in which the CEMS was last tested as part of the CEMS certification, as specified below for the type of test.
    8. Relative accuracy tests may be performed on an annual basis rather than on a semiannual basis if the relative accuracies during the previous audit for the NOX CEMS are 7.5 percent or less.
    9. For CEMS on any stack or duct through which no emissions have passed in two or more successive quarters, the semiannual assessments must be performed within 14 operating days after emissions pass through the stack/duct.

SCAQMD RULE 2012 ATTACHMENTS
LAST REVISED 11/11/11






TABLE OF CONTENTS
    
    
    
    TABLE OF CONTENTS
    ATTACHMENT A - 1N PROCEDURE
    A. Applicability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
    B. Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
    
         
         ATTACHMENT  A
1 N  PROCEDURE

A.  APPLICABILITY
    1.        This procedure may be used to provide substitute
              data for affected sources that meet the specified
              conditions in Chapter 2, Subdivision E, Paragraph
              1, Subparagraph b, Clause i, Chapter 2, Subdivision
              E, Paragraph 2, Subparagraph b, Clause i, and
              Chapter 3, Subdivision I, Paragraph 2, Subparagraph a.
B.     PROCEDURE
         1.   Where N is the number of hours of missing emissions
              data, determine the substitute hourly NOx
              concentration (in ppmv), or the hourly flow rate
              (in scfh) by averaging the measured or substituted
              values for the 1N hours immediately before the
              missing data period and the 1N hours immediately
              after the missing data period.
         2.   Where 1N hours before or after the missing data
              period includes a missing data hour, the
              substituted value previously recorded for such
              hour(s) pursuant to the missing data procedure
              shall be used to determine the average in
              accordance with Subdivision B, Paragraph 1 above.
         3.   Substitute the calculated average value for each
              hour of the N hours of missing data.
              
            EXAMPLES OF 1 N PROCEDURE
    
                EXAMPLE   1
                To fill in the missing three hours, take the data
              points from the 3 hours before and the 3 hours
              after the missing data period to determine an
              average emission over the 3 hours
              average emissions =  25 + 32 + 34 + 27 + 22 + 25 
              =  27.5 lb/hr.
                                    6
              
              The filled in data set should read as follows:
                  
                        EXAMPLES OF 1 N PROCEDURE
                                   
                             EXAMPLE 2
                                   
                        
              In this example the missing data point at 8 A.M.
              is in the 3-hour period after the 3- hour missing
              data period.  We first fill the 8.A.M. slot.
              average emissions for 8 A.M.  =  58 + 48  =  53
                               2
              The filled in data sheet at this point should read
              as follows:
              
                  
                
              The average for the three hour missing data period
              is:
              average emissions  =  45 + 50 + 53 + 58 + 53 + 48 
              =  51.2
                                    6
              The completed filled in data sheet should read as
              follows:
              
                  
              ATTACHMENT B


     BIAS TEST
     The bias of the data shall be determined based on the relative
accuracy
     (RA) test data sets and the relative accuracy (RATA) test audit
data
     sets for NOx pollutant concentration monitors, fuel gas sulfur
content
     monitors, flow monitors, and emission rate measurement systems
using
     the procedures outlined below.
     1.   Calculate the mean of the difference using Equation 2-1 of
40
          CFR, Part 60, Appendix B, Performance Specification 2.  To
          calculate bias for a NOx pollutant concentration monitor,
"d"
          shall, for each paired data point, be the difference between
the
          NOx concentration values (in ppmv) obtained from the
reference
          method and the monitor.  To calculate bias for a flow
monitor,
          "d" shall, for each paired data point, be the difference
          between the flow rate values (in dscfh) obtained from the
          reference method and the monitor.  To calculate bias for an
          emission rate measurement system, "d" shall,  for each
paired
          data point, be the difference between the emission rate
values
          (in lb/hr) obtained from the reference method and the
monitoring
          system.
      2.   Calculate the standard deviation, Sd, of the data set using
             Equation 2-2 of 40 CFR, Part 60, Appendix B, Performance
              Specification 2.
      3.   Calculate the confidence coefficient, cc, of the data set
using
              Equation 2-3 of 40 CFR, Part 60, Appendix B, Performance
              Specification 2.
      4.   The monitor passes the bias test if it meets either of the
              following criteria:
          a.   the absolute value of the mean difference is less than
                   |cc|.
          b.   the absolute value of the mean difference is less than
1
                   ppmv.
      5.   Alternatively, if the monitoring device fails to meet the
bias
              test requirement, the Facility Permit holder may choose
to use
              the bias adjustment procedure as follows:
          a.   If the CEMS is biased high reltive to the reference
                   method, no correction will be applied.
          b.   If the CEMS is biased low relative to the reference
                   method, the data shall be corrected for bias using
the
                   following procedure:
                      CEMiadjusted = CEMimonitored x BAF  (Eq. B-1)
          where:
                    CEMiadjusted = Data value adjusted for bias at
time i.
                    CEMimonitored = Data provided by the CEMS at time
i.
                    BAF = Bias Adjustment Factor.
                                                            
               BAF = 1 + (|d|/CEM)                 (Eq. B-2)
     where:
                 
               d    =    Arithmetic mean of the difference between the
                            CEMS and the reference method measurements
                            during the determination of the bias.
                                   
               CEM  =    Mean of the data values provided by the CEMS
                            during the determination of bias.
                         If the bias test failed in a multi-level RA
or RATA, calculate the
              BAF for each operating level.   Apply the largest BAF
obtained
              to correct for the CEM data output using equation B-1. 
Apply
              this adjustment to all monitoring data and emission
rates from
              the time and date of the failed bias test until the date
and
              time of a RATA that does not show bias.  These adjusted
values
              shall be used in all forms of missing data computation,
and in
              calculating the mass emission rate.
          The BAF is unique for each CEMS.  If backup CEMS is used,
any BAF
              applied to primary CEMS shall be applied to the backup
CEMS
              unless there are RATA data for the backup CEMS within
the
              previous year.
     

                             TABLE OF CONTENTS
                                
ATTACHMENT C - QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES
A. Quality Control Program.  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
B. Frequency of Testing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2



                    ATTACHMENT C
     QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL
                      PROCEDURES
                                      
    
A.     Quality Control Program
     Develop and implement a quality control program for the
continuous
     emission monitoring systems and their components.  As a minimum,
     include in each quality control program a written plan that
describes
     in detail complete, step-by-step procedures and operations for
each of
     the following activities:
     1.   Calibration Error Test Procedures
          Identify calibration error test procedures specific to the
CEMS
          that may require variance from the procedures used during
          certification (for example, how the gases are to be
injected,
          adjustments of flow rates and pressures, introduction of
          reference values, length of time for injection of
calibration
          gases, steps for obtaining calibration error, determination
of
          interferences, and when calibration adjustments should be
          made).
     2.   Calibration and Linearity Adjustments
          Explain how each component of the CEMS will be adjusted to
          provide correct responses to calibration gases, reference
          values, and/or indications of interference both initially
and
          after repairs or corrective action.  Identify equations,
          conversion factors, assumed moisture content, and other
          factors affecting calibration of each CEMS.
     3.   Preventative Maintenance
          Keep a written record of procedures, necessary to maintain
the
          CEMS in proper operating condition and a schedule for those
          procedures.  
     4.   Audit Procedures
          Keep copies of written reports received from testing
          firms/laboratories of procedures and details specific to the
          installed CEMS that were to be used by the testing
          firms/laboratories for relative accuracy test audits, such
as
          sampling and analysis methods.  The testing
firms/laboratories
          shall have received approval from the District by going
through
          the District's laboratory approval program.
     5.   Record Keeping Procedures
          Keep a written record describing procedures that will be
used
          to implement the record keeping and reporting requirements.
          Specific provisions of Section A-3 and A-5 above of the
quality
          control programs shall constitute specific guidelines for
facility
          personnel.  However facilities shall be required to take
reasonable
       steps to monitor and assure implementation of such specific
guidelines. 
    Such reasonable steps may include periodic audits, issuance of
    periodic reminders, implementing training classes, discipline of
    employees as necessary, and other appropriate measures.  Steps
that a
    facility commits to take to monitor and assure implementation of
the
    specific guidelines shall be set forth in the written plan and
shall
    be the only elements of Section A-3 and A-5 that constitute
    enforceable requirements under the written plan, unless other
program
    provisions are independently enforceable pursuant to other
requirements
    of the NOx protocols or District or federal rules or regulations.
B.     Frequency of Testing
     The frequency at which each quality assurance test must be
performed
         is as follows:
     1.   Daily Assessments
          For each monitor or CEMS, perform the following assessments
          on each day during which the unit combusts any fuel or
          processes any material (hereafter referred to as a "unit
          operating day"), or for a monitor or a CEMS on a bypass
         stack/duct, on each day during which emissions pass through
the
          bypass stack or duct.  These requirements are effective as
of the
          date when the monitor or CEMS completes certification
          testing.
          a.   Calibration Error Testing Requirements for Pollutant
               Concentration Monitors and O2 Monitors
               Test, record, and compute the calibration error of each
               NOx pollutant concentration monitor and O2 monitor at
               least once on each unit operating day, or for monitors
or
               monitoring systems on bypass stacks/ducts on each day
               that emissions pass through the bypass stack or duct. 
               Conduct calibration error checks, to the extent
               practicable, approximately 24 hours apart.  Perform the
               daily calibration error test according to the procedure
               in Paragraph B.1.a.ii. of this Attachment.
               For units with more than one span range, perform the
               daily calibration error test on each scale that has
been
               used since the last calibration error test.  For
example,
               if the emissions concentration has not exceeded the
low-
               scale span range since the previous calendar day, the
               calibration error test may be performed on the
low-scale
               only.  If, however, the emissions concentration has
               exceeded the low-scale span range since the previous
               calibration error test, perform the calibration error
               test on both the low- and high-scales
               i.   Design Requirements for Calibration Error Testing
                    of NOx Concentration Monitors and O2 Monitors
                    Design and equip each NOx concentration monitor
                    and O2 monitor with a calibration gas injection
                    port that allows a check of the entire
                    measurement system when calibration gases are
                    introduced.  For extractive and dilution type
                    monitors, all monitoring components exposed to
                    the sample gas, (for example, sample lines,
filters,
                    scrubbers, conditioners, and as much of the probe
                    as practical) are included in the measurement
                    system.  For in situ type monitors, the
calibration
                    must check against the injected gas for the
                    performance of all electronic and optical
                    components (for example, transmitter, receiver,
                    analyzer).
                    Design and equip each pollutant concentration
                    monitor and O2 monitor to allow daily
                    determinations of calibration error (positive or
                    negative) at the zero-level (0 to 20 percent of
each
                    span range) and high-level (80 to 100 percent of
                    each span range) concentrations.
                    ii.  Calibration Error Test for NOx Concentration
                         Monitors and O2 Monitors
                        Measure the calibration error of each NOx
                        concentration analyzer and O2 monitor once
each
                        day according to the following procedures:
                        If any manual or automatic adjustments to the
                        monitor settings are made, conduct the
calibration
                        error test in a way that the magnitude of the
                        adjustments can be determined and recorded.
                        Perform calibration error tests at two
                        concentrations: (1) zero-level and (2) high
level. 
                        Zero level is 0 to 20 percent of each span
range,
                        and high level is 80 to 100 percent of each
span
                        range.  Use only NIST/EPA-approved certified
                        reference material, standard reference
material,
                        or Protocol 1 calibration gases certified by
the
                        vendor to be within 2 percent of the label
value.
                        Introduce the calibration gas at the gas
injection
                        port as specified above.  Operate each monitor
in its
                        normal sampling mode.  For extractive and
dilution
                        type monitors, pass the audit gas through all
                        filters, scrubbers, conditioners, and other
monitor
                        components used during normal sampling and
                        through as much of the sampling probe as
                        practical.  For in situ type monitors, perform
                        calibration checking all active electronic and
                        optical components, including the transmitter,
                        receiver, and analyzer.  Challenge the NOx
                        concentration monitors and the O2 monitors
once
                        with each gas.  Record the monitor response
from
                        the data acquisition and handling system.  Use
the
                        following equation to determine the
calibration
                        error at each concentration once each day:
                        CE  =  |R-A|  x  100               (Eq. C-1)
                                         S
                   Where,
                   CE = The percentage calibration error based on
                             the span range
                        R = The reference value of zero- or high-level
                             calibration gas introduced into the
                             monitoring system.
                        A = The actual monitoring system response to
the
                             calibration gas.
                        S = The span range of the instrument
                        b.   Calibration Error Testing Requirements
for Flow
                        Monitors
                        Test, compute, and record the calibration
error of
                        each flow monitor at least once each unit
                        operating day, or for monitors or monitoring
                        systems on bypass stacks/ducts, on each day
that
                        emissions pass the bypass stack or duct. 
Introduce
                        the reference values to the probe tip (or 
                        equivalent) or to the transducer.  The
reference
                        values must have at least two reference
values: (1)
                        zero to 20 percent of span range or an
equivalent
                        reference value (for example, pressure pulse
or
                        electronic signal),and (2) 50 to 70 percent of
span
                        range or an equivalent reference value. 
Record
                        flow monitor output from the data acquisition
and
                        handling systems before and after any
adjustments. 
                        Calculate the calibration error using the
                        following equation:
                        CE  =  |R-A|  x  100               (Eq. C-2)
                                       S
                   Where
                       CE = Percentage calibration error based on the
                             span range
                        R = Reference value of zero- or high-level
                             calibration gas introduced into the
                             monitoring system.
                        A = Actual monitoring system response to the
                             calibration gas.
                        S = Span range of the flow monitor.
              c.   Interference Check
                   Perform the daily flow monitor interference checks
                   specified in Paragraph B.1.c.i. of this Attachment
at least
                   once per operating day (when the unit(s) operate
for any
                   part of the day).
                   i.   Design Requirements for Flow Monitor
                        Interference Checks
                        Design and equip each flow monitor with a
means to
                        ensure that the moisture expected to occur at
the
                        monitoring location does not interfere with
the
                        proper functioning of the flow monitoring
system. 
                        Design and equip each flow monitor with a
means to
                        detect, on at least a daily basis, pluggage of
each
                        sample line and sensing port, and malfunction
of
                        each resistance temperature detector (RTD),
                        transceiver, or equivalent.
                        Design and equip each differential pressure
flow
                        monitor to provide (1) an automatic, periodic
                        backpurging (simultaneously on both sides of
the
                        probe) or equivalent method of sufficient
force
                        and frequency to keep the probe and lines
                        sufficiently free of obstructions on at least
a
                        daily basis to prevent sensing interference,
and (2)
                        a means to detecting leaks in the system at
least on
                        a quarterly basis (a manual check is
acceptable).
                        Design and equip each thermal flow monitor
with
                        a means to ensure on at least a daily basis
that the
                        probe remains sufficiently clean to prevent
                        velocity sensing interference.
                        Design and equip each ultrasonic flow monitor
with
                        a means to ensure on at least a daily basis
that the
                        transceivers remain sufficiently clean (for
                        example, backpurging the system) to prevent
                        velocity sensing interference.
              d.   Recalibration
                   Adjust the calibration, at a minimum, whenever the
daily
                   calibration error exceeds the limits of the
applicable
                   performance specification for the NOx monitor, O2
                   monitor, or flow monitor.  Repeat the calibration
error
                   test procedure following the adjustment or repair
to
                   demonstrate that the corrective actions were
effective. 
                   Document the adjustments made.
              e.   Out-of-Control Period
                   An out-of-control period occurs when the
calibration
                   drift of an NOx concentration monitor exceeds 5.0
percent
                   based upon the span range value, when the
calibration
                   drift of an O2 monitor exceeds 1.0 percent O2, or
when the
                   calibration drift of a flow monitor exceeds 6.0
percent
                   based upon the span range value, which is twice the
                   applicable specification.  The out-of-control
period
                   begins with the hour of completion of the failed
                   calibration drift test and ends with the hour of
                   completion following an effective recalibration. 
                   Whenever the failed calibration, corrective action,
and
                   effective recalibration occur within the same hour,
the
                   hour is not out-of-control if 2 or more valid
readings are
                   obtained during that hour as required by Chapter 2,
                   Subdivision B, Paragraph 5.
                   An out-of-control period also occurs whenever
                   interference of a flow monitor is identified.  The
out-of-
                   control period begins with the hour of the failed
                   interference check and ends with the hour of
completion
                   of an interference check that is passed.
              f.   Data Recording
                   Record and tabulate all calibration error test data
                   according to the month, day, clock-hour, and
magnitude
                   in ppm, DSCFH, and percent volume.  Program
monitors
                   that automatically adjust data  to the calibrated
                   corrected calibration values (for example,
                   microprocessor control) to record either: (1) the
                   unadjusted concentration or flow rate measured in
the
                   calibration error test prior to resetting the
calibration,
                   or (2) the magnitude of any adjustment.  Record the
                   following applicable flow monitor interference
check
                   data: (1) sample line/sensing port pluggage, and
(2)
                   malfunction of each RTD, transceiver, or
equivalent.
         2.   Semiannual Assessments
              For each monitor or CEMS, perform the following
assessments
              once semiannually after the calendar operating quarter
in
              which the monitor or monitoring system was last tested,
as
              specified below for the type of test.  For the monitors
or CEMS
              on bypass stacks/ducts, the assessments are to be
performed
              once every two successive bypass operating quarters
after the
              calendar quarter in which the monitor or monitoring
system
              was last tested, as specified below for the type of
test.  This
              requirement is effective as of the calendar operating
quarter
              or bypass operating quarter following the calendar
quarter in
              which the monitor or CEMS is certified.
               Relative accuracy tests may be performed on an annual
basis
              rather than on a semiannual basis if the relative
accuracy
              during the previous audit for the NOx pollutant
concentration
              monitor, flow monitoring system, and NOx emission rate
              measurement system is 7.5 percent or less.
               For monitors on any stack or duct through which no
emissions
              have passed in two or more successive quarters, the
semiannual
              assessments must be performed within 14 operating days
after
              emissions pass through the stack/duct.
              a.   Relative Accuracy Test Audit
                   Perform relative accuracy test audits and bias
tests
                   semiannually and no less than 4 months apart for
each
                   NOx pollutant concentration monitor, stack gas
                   volumetric flow measurement systems, and the NOx
                   emission rate measurement system in accordance with
                   Chapter 2, Subdivision B, Paragraph 10, Chapter 2,
                   Subdivision B, Paragraph 11, and Chapter 2,
Subdivision B,
                   Paragraph 12.  For monitors on bypass stacks/ducts,
                   perform relative accuracy test audits once every
two
                   successive bypass operating quarters in accordance
with
                   Paragraphs 2.B.10, 2.B.11, and 2.B.12 .
              b.   Out-of-Control Period
                   An out-of-control period occurs under any of the
                   following conditions: (1) The relative accuracy of
an NOx
                   pollutant concentration monitor or the NOx emission
                   rate measurement system exceeds 20.0 percent; or
(2) the
                   relative accuracy of the flow rate monitor exceeds
10.0
                   percent.  The out-of-control period begins with the 
hour
                   of completion of the failed relative accuracy test
audit
                   and ends with the hour of completion of a
satisfactory
                   relative accuracy test audit.
                   Failure of the bias test results in the system or
monitor
                   being out-of-control.  The out-of-control period
begins
                   with the  hour of completion of the failed bias
test audit
                   and ends with the hour of completion of a
satisfactory
                   bias test.
                   
                   
                        TABLE OF CONTENTS


ATTACHMENT D - EQUIPMENT TUNING PROCEDURES
A. Procedures
D-1


EQUIPMENT TUNING PROCEDURES
A.  PROCEDURES
    Nothing in this Equipment Tuning Procedure shall be construed to
    require any act or omission that would result in unsafe conditions
or
    would be in violation of any regulation or requirement established
by
    Factory Mutual, Industrial Risk Insurers, National Fire Prevention
    Association, the California Department of Industrial Relations
    (Occupational Safety and Health Division), the Federal
Occupational
    Safety and Health Administration, or other relevant regulations
and
    requirements.
  1.   Operate the unit at the firing rate most typical of normal
operation. 
       If the unit experiences significant load variations during
normal
       operation, operate it at its average firing rate.
  2.   At this firing rate, record stack-gas temperature, oxygen
       concentration, and CO concentration (for gaseous fuels) or
smoke-spot
       number 2 (for liquid fuels), and observe flame conditions after
unit
       operation stabilizes at the firing rate selected.  If the
excess
       oxygen in the stack gas is at the lower end of the range of
typical
       minimum values, and if CO emissions are low and there is no
smoke, the
       unit is probably operating at near optimum efficiency at this
         particular firing rate.
   3. Increase combustion air flow to the furnace until stack-gas
oxygen
      levels increase by one to two percent over the level measured in
Step
      2.  As in Step 2, record the stack-gas temperature, CO
concentration
      (for gaseous fuels) or smoke-spot number (for liquid fuels), and
      observe flame conditions for these higher oxygen levels after
boiler
      operation stabilizes.
   4. Decrease combustion air flow until the stack gas oxygen
concentration
      is at the level measure in Step 2.  From this level, gradually
reduce
      the combustion air flow in small increments.  After each
increments,
      record the stack-gas temperature, oxygen concentration, CO
      concentration (for gaseous fuels), and smoke-spot number (for
liquid
      fuels).  Also observe the flame and record any changes in its
      condition.
   5. Continue to reduce combustion air flow stepwise, until one of
these
      limits is reached:
          a.   Unacceptable flame conditions, such as flame
impingement on
               furnace walls or burner parts, excessive flame
carryover, or
               flame instability; or
          b.   Stack gas CO concentrations greater than 400 ppm; or
          c.   Smoking at the stack; or
          d.   Equipment-related limitations, such as low
windbox/furnace
              pressure differential, built in air-flow limits, etc.
   6. Develop an O2/CO curve (for gaseous fuels) or O2/smoke curve
(for
      liquid fuels) using the excess oxygen and CO or smoke-spot
number data
      obtained at each combustion air flow setting.
   7. From the curves prepared in Step 6, find the stack-gas oxygen
levels
      where the CO emissions or smoke-spot number equal the following
      values:
                 Fuel                  Measurement     Value
                 Gaseous               CO emissions    400 ppm
                 #1 and #2 oils        smoke-spot number    number 1
                 #4 oil                smoke-spot number    number 2
                 #5 oil                smoke-spot number    number 3
                 Other oils            smoke-spot number    number 4
      The above conditions are referred to as the CO or smoke
thresholds,
      or as the minimum excess oxygen level.
      Compare this minimum value of excess oxygen to the expected
value
      provided by the combustion unit manufacturer.  If the minimum
level
      found is substantially higher than the value provided by the
combustion
      unit manufacturer, burner adjustments can probably be made to
improve
      fuel and air mixing, thereby allowing operation with less air.
   8. Add 0.5 to 2.0 percent of the minimum excess oxygen level found
in
      Step 7 and reset burner controls to operate automatically at
this
      higher stack-gas oxygen level.  This margin above the minimum
oxygen
      level accounts for fuel variations, variations in atmospheric
      conditions, load changes, and nonrepeatability or play in
automatic
      controls.
   9. If the load of the combustion unit varies significantly during
normal
      operation, repeat Steps 1-8 for firing rates that represent the
upper
      and lower limits of the range of the load.  Because control
      adjustments at one firing rate may affect conditions at other
firing
      rates, it may not be possible to establish the optimum excess
oxygen
      level at all firing rates.  If this is the case, choose the
burner
      control settings that give best performance over the range of
firing
      rates.  If one firing rate predominates, settings should
optimize
      conditions at that rate.
  10. Verify that the new settings can accommodate the sudden load
changes
      that may occur in daily operation without adverse effects.  Do
this by
      increasing and decreasing load rapidly while observing the flame
and
      stack.  If any of the conditions in Step 5 result, reset the
      combustion controls to provide a slightly higher level of excess
oxygen
      at the affected firing rates.  Next, verify these new recorded
at
      steady-rate operating conditions for future reference.
       
    
                LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS
             
                APEP           Annual Permit Emission Program
                API            American Petroleum Institute
                ASTM           American Society for Testing &
Materials
                BACT           Best Available Control Technology
                bhp            Brake Horsepower
                bpd            Barrels per Day
                Btu            British Thermal Unit
                CEMS           Continuous Emission Monitoring System
                CPMS           Continuous Process Monitoring System
                CPU            Central Processing Unit
                CSCACS         Central Station Compliance Advisory
Computer
                               System
                DAS            Data Acquisition System
                DM             District Method
                dscfh          Dry Standard Cubic Feet per Hour
                FCCU           Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit
                Fd             Dry F Factor
                FGR            Flue Gas Recirculation
                gpm            Gallons per Minute
                HRG            Hardware Requirement Guideline
                ICE            Internal Combustion Engine
                ID             Inside Diameter
                ISO            International Standards Organization
                lb mole        Pound mole
                LNB            Low NOx Burner
                MRR            Monitoring, Reporting and Recordkeeping
                NOx            Oxides of Nitrogen
                NIST           National Institute for Stantdards and
Testing
                NSCR           Non-Selective Catalytic Reduction
                O2             Oxygen
                ppmv           Parts per Million Volume
                ppmw           Parts per Million by Weight
                RAA            Relative Accuracy Audit
                RATA           Relative Accuracy Test Audit
                RECLAIM        Regional Clean Air Incentives Market
                RM             Reference Method
                RTC            RECLAIM Trading Credits
                RTCC           Real Time Calendar/Clock
                RTU            Remote Terminal Unit
                scfh           Standard Cubic Feet per Hour
                scfm           Standard Cubic Feet per Minute
                SCR            Selective Catalytic Reduction
                SDD            Software Design Description
                SNCR           Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction
                SOx            Oxides of Sulfur
                SRG            Software/Hardware Requirement Guideline
                swi            Steam Water Injection
                tpd            Tons per day
                tpy            Tons per year
                WAN            Wide Area Network
             
             DEFINITIONS
(1)  AFTERBURNERS, also called VAPOR INCINERATORS, are air pollution
       control devices in which combustion converts the combustible
materials in
       gaseous effluents to carbon dioxide and water.
(2)  ANNUAL PERMIT EMISSIONS PROGRAM (APEP) is the annual facility
       permit compliance reporting, review, and fee reporting program.
(3)  BOILER should generally be considered as any combustion equipment
used
    to produce steam, including a carbon monoxide boiler.  This would
    generally not include a process heater that transfers heat from
combustion
    gases to process streams, a waste heat recovery boiler that is
used to
    recover sensible heat from the exhaust of process equipment such
as a
    combustion turbine, or a recovery furnace that is used to recover
process
    chemicals.  Boilers used primarily for residential space and/or
water
    heating are not affected by this section.
(4)  BREAKDOWN means a condition caused by circumstances beyond the
    operator's control which result in a fire or mechanical or
electrical
    failure causing an emission increase in excess of emissions under
normal
    operating conditions.
(5)  BURN means to combust any gaseous fuel, whether for useful heat
or by
    incineration without recovery, except for flaring or emergency
vent gases.
(6) BYPASS OPERATING QUARTER means each calendar quarter that
emissions
    pass through the bypass stack or duct.
(7) CALCINER is a rotary kiln where calcination reaction is carried
out
    between 1315 oC to 1480 oC.
(8) CEMENT KILN is a device for the calcining and clinkering of
limestone,
    clay and other raw materials, and recycle dust in the dry-process
    manufacture of  cement.
(9) CONCENTRATION LIMIT is a value expressed in ppmv, is measured over
    any continuous 60 minutes, is elected by the Facility Permit
holder for
    a large NOx source, and is specified in the Facility Permit.
(10) CONTINUOUS EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEM (CEMS) is the total
    equipment required for the determination of concentrations of air
    contaminants and diluent gases in a source effluent as well as
mass
    emission rate.  The system consists of the following three major
    subsystems:
   (A) SAMPLING INTERFACE is that portion of the monitoring system
       that performs one or more of the following operations: 
extraction,
       physical/chemical separation, transportation, and conditioning
of
       a sample of the source effluent or protection of the analyzer
from
       the hostile aspects of the sample or source environment.
   (B) ANALYZERS
      (i) AIR CONTAMINANT ANALYZER is that portion of the
          monitoring system that senses the air contaminant and
          generates a signal output which is a function of the
          concentration of that contaminant.
      (ii)DILUENT ANALYZER is that portion of the monitoring system
          that senses the concentration of oxygen or carbon dioxide or
          other diluent gas as applicable, and generates a signal
          output which is a function of a concentration of that
diluent
          gas.
   (C) DATA RECORDER is that portion of the monitoring system that
       provides a permanent record of the output signals in terms of
       concentration units, and includes additional equipment such as
a
       computer required to convert the original recorded value to any
       value required for reporting.
(11) CONTINUOUS PROCESS MONITORING SYSTEM is the total equipment
    required for the measurement and collection of process variables
(e.g.,
    fuel usage rate, oxygen content of stack gas, or process weight). 
Such
    CPMS data shall be used in conjunction with the appropriate
emission rate
    to determine NOx emissions.
(12) CONTINUOUSLY MEASURE means to measure at least once every 15
minutes
    except during period of routine maintenance and calibration, as
specified
    in 40CFR Part 60.13(e)(2).
(13) DAILY means a calendar day starting at 12 midnight and continuing
    through to the following 12 midnight hour.
(14) DIRECT MONITORING DEVICE is a device that directly measures the
    variables specified by the Executive Officer to be necessary to
determine
    mass emissions of a RECLAIM pollutant and which meets all the
standards
    of performance for CEMS set forth in the protocols for NOx and
SOx.
(15) DRYER is an equipment that removes substances by heating or other
    process.
(16) ELECTRONICALLY TRANSMITTING means transmitting measured data
without
    human alteration between the point/source of measurement and
transmission.
(17) EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT is equipment solely used on a standby basis
in
    cases of emergency, defined as emergency equipment on the Facility
    Permit; or is equipment that does not operate more than 200 hours
per
    year and is not used in conjunction with any voluntary demand
reduction
    program, and is defined as emergency equipment in the Facility
Permit.
(18) EMISSION FACTOR is the value specified in Tables 1 (NOx) or 2
(SOx)
    of Rule 2002-Baselines and Rates of Reduction for NOx and SOx.
(19) EMISSION RATE (ER) - is a value expressed in terms of NOx mass
    emissions per unit of heat input, and derived using the
methodology
    specified in the "Protocol for Monitoring, Reporting, and
Recordkeeping
    for Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) Emissions" Chapter .
(20) EXISTING EQUIPMENT is any equipment which can emit NOx at a NOx
    RECLAIM facility, for which on or before (Rule Adoption date) has:
   (A) A valid permit to construct or permit to operate pursuant to
Rule
       201 and/or Rule 203 has been issued; or 
   (B) An application for a permit to construct or permit to operate
has
       been deemed complete by the Executive Officer; or
   (C) An equipment which is exempt from permit per Rule 219 and is
       operating on or before (Rule Adoption date).
(21) Fd FACTOR is the dry F factor for each fuel, the ratio of the dry
gas
    volume of the products of combustion to the heat content of the
fuel
    (dscf/106 Btu). F factors are available in 40 CFR Part 60,
Appendix
    A, Method 19.
(22) FLUID CATALYTIC CRACKING UNIT (FCCU) breaks down heavy petroleum
    products into lighter products using heat in the presence of
finely
    divided catalyst maintained in a fluidized state by the oil
vapors.  The
    fluid catalyst is continuously circulated between the reactor and
the
    regenerator, using air, oil vapor, and steam as the conveying
media.
(23) FURNACE is an enclosure in which energy in a nonthermal form is
    converted to heat.
(24) GAS FLARE is a combustion equipment used to prevent unsafe
operating
    pressures in process units during shut downs and start-ups and to
handle
    miscellaneous hydrocarbon leaks and process upsets.
(25) GAS TURBINES are turbines that use gas as the working fluid.  It
is
    principally used to propel jet aircraft.  Their stationary uses
include
    electric power generation (usually for peak-load demands),
end-of-line
    voltage booster service for long distance transmission lines, and
for
    pumping natural gas through long distance pipelines.  Gas turbines
are
    used in combined (cogeneration) and simple-cycle arrangements.
(26) GASEOUS FUELS include, but are not limited to, any natural,
process,
    synthetic, landfill, sewage digester, or waste gases with a gross
heating
    value of 300 Btu per cubic foot or higher, at standard conditions.
(27) HEAT VALUE is the heat generated when one lb. of combustible is
    completely burned.
(28) HEATER is any combustion equipment fired with liquid and/or
gaseous fuel
    and which transfers heat from combustion gases to water or process
    streams.
(29) HIGH HEAT VALUE is determined experimentally by colorimeters in
which
    the products of combustion are cooled to the initial temperature
and the
    heat absorbed by the cooling media is measured.
(30) HOT STAND-BY is the period of operation when the flow or emission
    concentration are so low they can not be measured in a
representative
    manner.
(31) INCINERATOR is an equipment that consume substances by burning.
(32) INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE is any spark or compression-ignited
    internal combustion engine, not including engines used for
self-propulsion.
(33) LIQUID FUELS include, but are not limited to, any petroleum
distillates
    or fuels in liquid form derived from fossil materials or
agricultural
    products for the purpose of creating useful heat.
(34) MASS EMISSION OF NOx in lbs/hr is the measured emission rates of
    nitrogen oxides.
(35) MAXIMUM RATED CAPACITY means maximum design heat input in Btu per
    hour at the higher heating value of the fuels.
(36) MODEM converts digital signals into audio tones to be transmitted
over
    telephone lines and also convert audio tones from the lines to
digital
    signals for machine use.
(37) MONTHLY FUEL USE REPORTS could be sufficed by the monthly gas
bill
    or the difference between the end and the begininning of the
calendar
    month's fuel meter readings.
(38) NINETIETH (90TH) PERCENTILE means a value that would divide an
    ordered set of inceasing values so that at least 90 percent are
less than
    or equal to the value and at least 10 percent are greater than or
equal
    to the value.
(39) OVEN is a chamber or enclosed compartment equipped to heat
objects.
(40) PEAKING UNIT means a turbine used intermittently to produce
energy on
    a demand basis.
(41) PORTABLE EQUIPMENT is an equipment which is not attached to a
    foundation and is not operated at a single facility for more than
90 days
    in a year and is not a replacement equipment for a specific
application
    which lasts or is intended to last for more than one year.
(42) PROCESS HEATER means any combustion equipment fired with liquid
and/or
    gaseous fuel and which transfers heat from combustion gases to
process
    streams.
(43) PROCESS WEIGHT means the total weight of all materials introduced
into
    any specific process which may discharge contaminants into the
atmosphere. 
    Solid fuels charged shall be considered as part of the process
weight, but
    liquid gaseous fuels and air shall not.
(44) RATED BRAKE HORSEPOWER (bhp) is the maximum rating specified by
the
    manufacturer and listed on the nameplate of that equipment.  If
not
    available, then the rated brake horsepower of an internal
combustion
    engine can be calculated by multiplying the maximum fuel usage per
unit
    time, heating value of fuel, equipment efficiency provided by the
    manufacturer, and the conversion factor (one brake horsepower =
2,545
    Btu).
(45) RATED HEAT INPUT CAPACITY is the heat input capacity specified on
the
    nameplate of the combustion unit.  If the combustion unit has been
altered
    or modified such that its maximum heat input is different than the
heat
    input capacity specified on the nameplate, the new maximum heat
input
    shall be considered as the rated heat input capacity.
(46) RECLAIM FACILITY is a facility that has been listed as a
participant
    in the Regional Clean Air Incentives Market (RECLAIM) program.
(47) REMOTE TERMINAL UNIT (RTU) is a data collection and transmitting
    device used to transmit data and  calculated results to the
District
    Central Station Computer.
(48) RENTAL EQUIPMENT is equipment which is rented or leased for
operation
    by someone other than the owner of the equipment.
(49) SHUTDOWN is that period of time during which the equipment is
allowed
    to cool from a normal operating temperature range to a  cold or
ambient
    temperature.
(50) SOLID FUELS include, but are not limited to, any solid organic
material
    used as fuel for the purpose of creating useful heat.
(51) STANDARD GAS CONDITIONS are defined as a temperature of 68 oF and
one
    atmosphere of pressure.
(52) START-UP is that period of time during which the equipment is
heated to
    operating temperature from a  cold or ambient temperature.
(53) SULFURIC ACID PRODUCTION UNIT means any facility producing
sulfuric
    acid by the contact process by burning  elemental sulfur,
alkylation acid,
    hydrogen sulfide, organic sulfides and mercaptans or acid sludge,
but does
    not include facilities where conversion to sulfuric acid as
utilized
    primarily as a means of preventing emissions to the atmosphere of
sulfur
    dioxide or other sulfur compounds.
(54) TAIL GAS UNIT is a SOx control equipment associated with refinery
    sulfur recovery plant.
(55) TEST CELLS are devices used to test the performance of engines
such as
    internal combustion engine and jet engines.
(56) TIMESHARING OF MONITOR means the use of a common monitor for
several
    sources of emissions.
(57) TURBINES are machines that convert energy stored in a fluid into
    mechanical energy by channeling the fluid through a system of
stationary
    and moving vanes.
(58) UNIT OPERATING DAY means each calendar day that emissions pass
through
    the stack or duct.
(59) UNIVERSE OF SOURCES FOR NOx is a list of RECLAIM facilities that
    emit NOx.
(60) UNIVERSE OF SOURCES FOR SOx is a list of RECLAIM facilities that
    emit SOx.
(61) AP 42 is a publication published by Environmental Protection
Agency
    (EPA) which is a compilation of air pollution emission rates used
to
    determine mass emission.
(62) ASTM METHOD D1945-81 Method for Analysis of natural gas by gas
    chromatography.
(63) ASTM METHOD 2622-82 Test Method for sulfur in petroleum products
    (Xray Spectrographic method)
(64) ASTM METHOD 3588-91 method for calculating colorific value and
    specific gravity (relative density) of gaseous fuels.
(65) ASTM METHOD 4294-90 test method for sulfur in petroleum products
by
    non-dispersive Xray fluorescence spectrometry.
(66) ASTM METHOD 4891-84 test method for heating value of gases in
natural
    gas range by stoichiometric combustion.
(67) DISTRICT METHOD 2.1 measures gas flow rate through stacks greater
than
    12 inch in diameter.
(68) DISTRICT METHOD 7.1 colorimetric determination of nitrogen oxides
    except nitrous oxide emissions from stationary sources by using
the
    phenoldisulfonic acid (pds) procedure or ion chromatograph
procedures. 
    Its range is 2 to 400 milligrams NOx (as NO2 per DSCM).
(69) DISTRICT METHOD 100.1 is an instrumental method for measuring
gaseous
    emissions of nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide,
carbon
    dioxide, and oxygen.
(70) DISTRICT METHOD 307-91 laboratory procedure for analyzing total
    reduced sulfur compounds and SO2.
(71) EPA METHOD 19 is the method of determining sulfur dioxide removal
    efficiency and particulate, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides
emission
    rates from electric utility steam generators.
(72) EPA METHOD 450/3-78-117 air pollutant emission rate for Military
and
    Civil Aircraft.