SLOAPCD RULE 407 ORGANIC MAT. EMIS. STDS, LIMITS., & PROHIB.

LAST REVISED 07/12/94



RULE 407.ORGANIC MATERIAL EMISSION STANDARDS, LIMITATIONS AND

PROHIBITIONS

(Adopted 8/2/76; Revised 7/5/77; 3/27/78; 6/18/79;

2/23/88; 1/10/89; and 7/12/94)







A. STORAGE AND TRANSFER OF GASOLINE

1. Submerged Fill Pipes

a. Any person transferring or permitting the transfer

of gasoline into any storage container which has a

capacity greater than or equal to 250 gallons or

less than or equal to 40,000 gallons shall ensure

that such transfer is accomplished through a

permanently installed submerged fill pipe and that

such transfer is accomplished using a tight-fitting

nozzle or some other method to prevent excessive

aspiration of air into the storage container.

b. A person shall not install any gasoline tank with a

capacity of 250 gallons or more unless such a tank

is equipped as described in Subsection A.1.a.

c. The provisions of Subsection A.1.a shall not apply

to:

1) the loading of gasoline into any underground tank

installed prior to December 31, 1970, where the

fill line between the fill connection and tank is

offset;

2) wind machines used in agricultural operations.

2. Any gasoline storage container which has a capacity

greater than 1,500 gallons and less than or equal to

40,000 gallons and is not otherwise exempt under Rule

424 shall:

a. Be equipped with a Phase I vapor recovery system as

defined in Subsection C.2 of this Rule; and,

b. For above ground storage, be equipped with a

pressure-vacuum relief valve with minimum pressure

and vacuum settings of 90 percent of the maximum,

safe pressure and vacuum ratings of the container.

The pressure-vacuum relief valve shall be maintained

in good working order.

3. Any person transferring or permitting the transfer of

gasoline into any storage container, equipped as

described in Subsection A.2.a, shall ensure that such

transfer is accomplished using the Phase I vapor

recovery system. The vapor recovery system shall be

operated as it was operated when the system type was

certified by the California Air Resources Board.

B. GASOLINE BULK PLANTS AND GASOLINE TERMINALS

1. Any gasoline terminal or gasoline bulk plant, with a

daily throughput equal to or greater than 20,000 gallons

or an annual throughput equal to or greater than

3,000,000 gallons, shall be equipped with a vapor

recovery system certified by the California Air

Resources Board which shall prevent emission to the

atmosphere of at least 90 percent by weight of the

gasoline vapors displaced during loading of delivery

vessels. Vapor recovery system efficiency shall be

determined by ARB Method 202 or 203.

2. Any person transferring or permitting the transfer of

gasoline into any delivery vessel from any gasoline

terminal or bulk plant required to have a vapor recovery

system pursuant to Subsection B.1 shall load such vessel

using the vapor recovery system. The vapor recovery

system shall be operated as it was operated when the

system type was certified by the California Air

Resources Board or approved by the Air Pollution Control

District. Loading shall be accomplished in such a

manner that displaced organic gases will be vented only

to the vapor collection system. Measures shall be taken

to prevent liquid drainage from the loading device when

it is not in use or to accomplish complete drainage

before the loading device is disconnected.

3. Any delivery vessel loaded with gasoline at a gasoline

terminal or bulk plant, equipped as required by

Subsection B.1, shall be equipped with a vapor recovery

system certified annually by the California Air

Resources Board.

4. Any gasoline delivery vessel, manufactured and purchased

after March 27, 1978, shall be equipped with a vapor

recovery system with a system design approved by the

California Air Resources Board.

5. Any person transferring or permitting the transfer of

gasoline into any delivery vessel from any gasoline

loading facility at any gasoline terminal or any

gasoline bulk plant, exempt from the requirements of

Subsection B.1, shall ensure that such delivery vessel

is loaded through a submerged fill pipe.

C. DEFINITIONS

For the purposes of Sections A and B of this Rule the

following definitions shall apply:

1. "Submerged Fill Pipe": Any fill pipe the discharge

opening of which is entirely submerged when the liquid

level is 6 inches above the bottom of the container.

2. "Phase I Vapor Recovery System": A system certified by

the California Air Resources Board, for reducing the

emission into the atmosphere of organic gases resulting

from the transfer of gasoline into a gasoline storage

container.

3. "Gasoline Terminal": A gasoline distribution facility

where delivery to the facility's storage containers is

by means other than truck.

4. "Gasoline Bulk Plant": An intermediate gasoline

distribution facility where delivery to the facility's

storage containers and delivery from the facility is by

truck.

5. "Gasoline": Any petroleum distillate having a Reid vapor

pressure of 4.0 pounds per square inch or greater, which

is sold or intended for sale for use in motor vehicles

or engines and is commonly or commercially known or sold

as gasoline.

D. SOLVENTS, THINNERS, AND COATINGS

1. Organic Solvents

a. A person shall not discharge into the atmosphere

more than 15 pounds of organic materials in any one

day, nor more than 3 pounds in any one hour from any

article, machine, equipment or other contrivance in

which any organic solvent or any material containing

organic solvent comes into contact with flame, or is

baked, heat-cured or heat polymerized in the

presence of oxygen, unless said discharge has been

reduced by at least 85 percent. Those portions of

any series of articles, machines, equipment or other

contrivances designed for processing a continuous

web, strip or wire which emit organic materials and

using operations described in this Section shall be

collectively subject to compliance with this

Subsection D.1.a.

b. A person shall not discharge into the atmosphere

more than 40 pounds of organic materials in any one

day, nor more than 8 pounds in any one hour from any

article, machine, equipment or other contrivance

used under conditions other than described in

Subsection D.1.a for employing or applying any

photochemically reactive solvent, as defined in

Subsection D.1.j or material containing such

photochemically reactive solvent, unless said

discharge has been reduced by at least 85 percent.

Emissions of organic materials into the atmosphere

resulting from air or heated drying of products for

the first 12 hours after their removal from any

article, machine, equipment or other contrivance

described in this Section shall be included in

determining compliance with this Section. Emissions

resulting from baking, heat-curing or

heat-polymerizing as described in Subsection D.1.a

shall be excluded from determination of compliance

with this Subsection D.1.b. Portions of any series

of articles, machines, equipment or other

contrivances designed for processing a continuous

web, strip or wire which emit organic materials and

using operations described in this Section, shall be

collectively subject to compliance with this

Subsection D.1.b.

c. A person shall not discharge into the atmosphere

more than 3,000 pounds of organic materials in any

one day, nor more than 450 pounds in any one hour,

from any article, machine, equipment or other

contrivance in which any non-photochemically

reactive organic solvent or any material containing

such

solvent is employed or applied, unless said

discharge has been reduced by at least 85 percent.

Emission of organic materials into the atmosphere

resulting from air or heated drying of products for

the first 12 hours after their removal from any

article, machine, equipment or other contrivance

described in this Section, shall be included in

determining compliance with this Section. Emission

resulting from baking, heat-curing or

heat-polymerizing, as described in Subsection D.1.a

shall be excluded from determination of compliance

with this Section. Those portions of any series of

articles, machines, equipment or other contrivances

designed for processing a continuous web, strip or

wire, which emit organic materials and using

operations described in this Section shall be

collectively subject to compliance with this

Subsection D.1.c.

d. Emissions of organic materials to the atmosphere

from the cleanup with photochemically reactive

solvents, as defined in Subsection D.1.j of any

article, machine, equipment or other contrivance

described in Subsections D.1.a, b, or c shall be

included with the other emissions or organic

materials from that article, machine, equipment or

other contrivance for determining compliance with

this Subsection D.1.

e. Emissions of organic materials into the atmosphere

required to be controlled by Subsections D.1.a, b,

or c shall be reduced by:

(1)Incineration, provided that 90 percent or more of

the carbon in the organic material being

incinerated is oxidized to carbon dioxide; or

(2)Adsorption; or

(3)Processing in a manner determined by the Air

Pollution Control Officer to be not less

effective than (1) or (2) above.

f. A person incinerating, adsorbing, or otherwise

processing organic materials pursuant to this

Subsection D.1 shall provide, properly install and

maintain in calibration, in good working order and

in operation, devices as specified in the Authority

to Construct or the Permit to Operate, or as

specified by the Air Pollution Control Officer, for

indicating temperatures, pressures, rates of flow or

other operating conditions necessary to determine

the degree and effectiveness of air pollution

control equipment.

g. Any person using organic solvents or any materials

containing organic solvents shall supply the Air

Pollution Control Officer, upon request and in a

manner and form prescribed by him, written evidence

of the chemical composition, physical properties and

amount consumed for each organic solvent used.



h. The provisions of this Subsection D.1 shall not

apply to:

(1)The manufacture of organic solvents, or the

transport or storage of organic solvents or

materials containing organic solvents.

(2)The use of equipment for which other requirements

are specified by Subsections A and B of this

Rule, Rule 419, Petroleum Pits, Ponds, Sumps,

Well Cellars, and Wastewater Separators, and Rule

425, Storage of Volatile Organic Compounds, or

which are exempt from air pollution control

requirements by said Rules.

(3)The spraying or other employment of insecticides,

pesticides or herbicides.

(4)The employment, application, evaporation, or

drying of saturated halogenated hydrocarbons or

perchloroethylene.

(5)The use of any material, in any article, machine,

equipment, or other contrivance described in

Subsections D.1.a, b, c, or d, if:

(a) The volatile content of such material

consists only of water and organic solvents;

and

(b) The organic solvents comprised of not more

than 20 percent by volume of said volatile

content; and

(c) The volatile content is not photochemically

reactive as defined in Subsection D.1.j; and

(d) The organic solvent or any material

containing organic solvent does not come into

contact with flame.

i. For the purposes of Section D of this Rule, organic

solvents include diluents and thinners and are

defined as organic materials which are liquids at

standard conditions and which are used as

dissolvers, viscosity reducers or cleaning agents,

except that such materials which exhibit a boiling

point higher than 220F at 0.5 millimeter mercury

absolute pressure or having an equivalent vapor

pressure shall not be considered to be solvents

unless exposed to temperatures exceeding 220F.

j. For the purposes of Section D of this Rule, a

photochemically reactive solvent is any solvent with

an aggregate of more than 20 percent of its total

volume composed of the chemical compounds classified

below or which exceeds any of the following

individual percentage composition limitations,

referred to the total volume of solvent:



(1)A combination of hydrocarbons, alcohols,

aldehydes, esters, ethers, or ketones, having an

olefinic or cyclolefinic type of unsaturation: 5

percent;

(2)A combination of aromatic compounds with 8 or

more carbon atoms to the molecule, except

ethylbenzene: 8 percent;

(3)A combination of ethylbenzene, ketones having

branched hydrocarbon structures,

trichloroethylene or toluene: 20 percent.

Whenever any organic solvent or any constituent of

any organic solvent may be classified from its

chemical structure into more than one of the above

groups of organic compounds, it shall be considered

as a member of the most reactive chemical group,

i.e. that group having the least allowable percent

of the total volume of solvents. The percentage

composition of chemical compounds in photochemically

reactive solvents may be determined using ASTM

Method E-168-67, E-169-87, or E-260-85.

k. For the purposes of Section D of this Rule, organic

materials are defined as chemical compounds of

carbon excluding carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide,

carbonic acid, metallic carbides, metallic

carbonates and ammonium carbonate.

2. Metal Surface Coating Thinners and Reducers

a. The composition of the organics in all metal surface

coating thinners and reducers that are manufactured

after January 1, 1977, and used in San Luis Obispo

County shall be such that it will not come under the

definition of photochemically reactive solvents, set

out in Subsection D.1.j of this Rule 407.

b. After July 1, 1977, the composition of the organics

in all metal surface coating thinners and reducers

that are used in San Luis Obispo County shall not be

photochemically reactive within the definitions of

Subsection D.1.j of this Rule 407.

3. Architectural Coatings

a. A person shall not sell or offer for sale for use in

San Luis Obispo County in containers of the one

quart capacity or larger any architectural coating

containing photochemically reactive solvent as

defined in Subsection D.1.j of this Rule 407.

b. A person shall not employ, apply, evaporate or dry

in San Luis Obispo County any architectural coating

purchased in containers of one quart capacity or

larger containing photochemically reactive solvent

as defined in Subsection D.1.j of this Rule 407.



c. A person shall not thin or dilute any architectural

coating with photochemically reactive solvent, as

defined in Subsection D.1.j of this Rule 407.

d. For the purposes of Section D of this Rule, an

architectural coating is defined as a coating used

for residential or commercial buildings and their

appurtenances, or industrial buildings.

4. Disposal and Evaporation of Solvents

A person shall not in any one day dispose of a total or

more than 1½ gallons of any photochemically reactive

solvent, as defined in Subsection D.1.j of this Rule

407, or of any material containing more than 1½ gallons

of any such photochemically reactive solvent by means

which will permit the evaporation of such solvent into

the atmosphere.