On-Road Measurement of Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks: Impacts of Fleet Turnover and ARBís Drayage Truck Regulation

This page last reviewed April 3, 2015

Background

Heavy-duty diesel trucks are a major source of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and exhaust particulate matter (PM) emissions in California. The Statewide Drayage Truck Regulation aims to reduce emissions of these pollutants by requiring universal use of diesel particle filter (DPF) emission control systems and replacement of pre-1994 model year engines on drayage trucks operating at major freight-handling facilities such as ports and rail yards. The DPF requirements were phased in over a period of three years ó between Jan 1, 2010 and Dec 31, 2012. In this study, the effects of fleet modernization and DPF retrofits on in-use trucks were examined through field measurements of truck emissions at the Port of Oakland. Truck emissions were measured during 2011 and 2013, using high time resolution (1 Hz or faster) instrumentation that could distinguish the exhaust plumes of individual trucks. This study adds to an existing record of on-road emissions data for drayage trucks measured at the same site in 2009 and 2010.


References

Results

  • Harley (November, 2014). On-Road Measurement of Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks: Impacts of Fleet Turnover and ARBís Drayage Truck Regulation ARB Research Final Report (PDF - 9,276KB)

Conference Presentations

  • Chelsea Preble et al. (2013). Effects of Diesel Particle Filters on Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck Emissions at the Port of Oakland. AAAR 32nd Annual Conference. September 30-October 4, 2013, Portland, OR. PDF (2.10 MB)
  • Robert Harley et al. (2015). On-Road Measurement of Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks: Impacts of Fleet Turnover and ARBís Drayage Truck Regulation. 2015 CRC Mobile Source Air Toxics Workshop, February 17-19, 2015 Sacramento, CA. PDF (3.78 MB)

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