Children's Health 

This page updated March 24, 2003.

Children may be more vulnerable to harmful impacts from air pollutants than adults for several reasons. They breathe more air than do adults, relative to their body size, and have greater metabolic growth requirements. Their activities create exposure scenarios that are unique for children. Children spend 86 percent of their time indoors, on average. The home is the primary location where they spend time; time at school accounts for most of their remaining time indoors. Often children's activities bring them into close proximity with indoor sources. For example, young children spend more time on the floor where they are more likely to inhale particles stirred up by activities.

The Air Resources Board (ARB) has several studies in progress to help us better understand children's exposures to air pollutants. More information on each study is available at the following links:

California Portable Classrooms Study

 

School Bus Exposure Study
 

Fresno Asthmatic Children's Environment Study (FACES)
 

Children's Indoor and Personal Air Monitoring Study (SB25)
 

Comprehensive ARB SB25 Program
 

Study of Children's Activity Patterns (Research Note 94-6)
 

Study of Children's Activity Patterns (Final Report)
 

Measurement of Breathing Rate and Volume in Routinely Performed Daily Activities (Research Note 94-11)
 

Measurement of Breathing Rate and Volume in Routinely Performed Daily Activities (Final Report)
 

Children's Health Study


Indoor Program

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